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Generational conflict comes to a polling place near you

The most memorable news photo I’ve seen in ages is one from the first School Strike 4 Climate late last year. It shows a young woman holding a sign: MESS WITH OUR CLIMATE & WE’LL MESS WITH YOUR PENSION. Ross Gittins The Canberra Times One minute we oldies are berating the younger generation for their seeming lack of interest in politics (although, having arrived on the scene at a time when our politicians are behaving so badly, who could blame ... Read More »

Energy and security in the Eastern Mediterranean

The discovery of hydrocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean’s Levant Basin has created new regional security dynamics. Petros Petrikkos Global Risk Insights The quest for power and influence hinders energy and economic cooperation. The growing ‘battle’ for the creation of a pipeline is not easily sustained due to the region’s unstable landscape. Research on the Levant Basin dates back to 2010 when the Leviathan block was first discovered by Ratio Oil. Following this, companies like US-owned Noble Energy and French giant ... Read More »

Top Chinese leader backs crackdown on Uighurs

Ruling Communist Party’s fourth-ranked leader Wang Yang said situation in Xianjiang was ‘continuing to develop well’. Al Jazeera News Agencies Xinjiang needs to “perfect” stability maintenance measures and crack down on “religious extremism”, the ruling Communist Party’s fourth-ranked leader said on a tour of the Chinese region where members of the Uighur community have been put in internment camps. Critics say Uighurs and other Muslims who live in Xinjiang are being held in detention centres, though the government calls them “vocational training ... Read More »

Little England, little Blitz?

Neil Berry on Brits, Brexit and myths of the people’s war It often seems that Nigel Farage is fighting the Second World War in his head. Neil Berry The Times Literary Supplement In the 2016 referendum he campaigned for British withdrawal from the European Union on a battle bus out of which boomed the march from the Second World War blockbuster The Great Escape. The following year found him thrilling to the film Dunkirk. For Farage, the near-disaster of the ... Read More »

Canada takes refugee who helped shelter Snowden in Hong Kong

Toronto: A Filipino woman who helped shelter former NSA contractor Edward Snowden when he fled to Hong Kong has been granted refugee status in Canada. Brisbane Times AP Vanessa Rodel and her daughter Keana arrived in Toronto on Monday evening. “I feel so great and I feel like I’m free,” she said. Lawyer Robert Tibbo represented Rodel as she sought asylum in Hong Kong in 2013 due to an alleged kidnap and rape by militants in her homeland. The attorney asked ... Read More »

Stopping an Unwanted War in Gaza

As in 2014, Hamas and Israel appear close to a conflagration that neither party desires – though now a shaky ceasefire seems to have taken hold. Tareq Baconi Crisis Group’s Israel/Palestine analyst Tareq Baconi explains how the parties got to the brink and how they can step back. What happened? In the early morning of 25 March a rocket fired from the Gaza Strip landed in Mishmeret, north of Tel Aviv, destroying a family house and wounding seven Israelis, including ... Read More »

Erdogan Is Weak. And Invincible.

Turkey’s president has rarely been so unpopular. He’s likely to dominate this week’s local elections anyway. Steven A. Cook FP No one ever prospered by predicting Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s political demise, but on the eve of Turkey’s local elections this weekend, he and his Justice and Development Party (AKP) seem weaker than ever. If he were not feeling political pressure, he would not be featuring the grotesque video of the Christchurch mosque massacre at campaign rallies, nor would ... Read More »

95-year-old caught four buses to join rally against racism

Ninety-five-year old John Sato caught four buses to join the march against racism in central Auckland at the weekend. Our reporter Chen Liu spoke to him. Radio New Zealand John Sato (C) 95, one of only two Japanese servicemen in the New Zealand army in WWII, took multiple buses from Howick to join the march against racism at Aotea Square. 95-year-old… Read More »

The strategic consequence of the Chagos Islands legal dispute

At the end of last month, the African archipelago nation of Mauritius secured an important legal victory in its territorial and maritime disputes against its former coloniser, the United Kingdom. Bec Strating Lowy Interpreter The International Court of Justice (ICJ) produce an advisory opinion that rejected the UK’s claims to sovereignty over the Chagos Islands, a small group of atolls in the Indian Ocean. It found instead that the UK had unlawfully separated the islands from the former colony of ... Read More »

Australia’s big media companies would face breakup under Greens’ ‘blow torch’ policy

Sarah Hanson-Young says party would put ‘public interest journalism and the public good’ ahead of profits Amy Remeikis Guardian Australia’s big media companies would be put under a “blow torch” under the federal Greens’ policy, which places breaking up the nation’s media concentration front and centre. Sarah Hanson-Young said the Greens’ policy, finalised in the wake of the Christchurch terror attack and subsequent coverage, as well as the recent Tayla Harris trolling and response, would “reorient priorities” to put “public interest journalism and the public good” ahead ... Read More »

Global carbon emissions hit record high in 2018, International Energy Agency says

Greater demand for energy and more extreme temperatures saw global carbon emissions reach a record high in 2018 partly because of higher coal use, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Sue Lannin ABC Carbon emissions rose by 1.7 per cent in 2018 to a record 33.1 billion tonnes, with coal making up one third of the total increase, according to the IEA’s Global Energy and C02 Status Report. That is despite energy generation from wind and solar farms growing ... Read More »

Decentralisation in Tunisia: Consolidating Democracy without Weakening the State

The decentralisation process is polarising Tunisia and risks fueling social and political tensions. ICG In order to fulfill its promise – to reduce socio-regional inequalities and improve public services – all sides must compromise on a new understanding of decentralisation that includes strengthening state services nationwide. Executive Summary Tunisia’s decentralisation process is increasingly in disarray. Through this reform, mandated by the new constitution adopted in January 2014, the central state is to cede certain of its powers to actors and ... Read More »

More fish, more fishing: why strategic marine park placement is a win-win

Australia has some of the most spectacular marine ecosystems on the planet – including, of course, the world-famous Great Barrier Reef. Authors: The Conversation Many of these places are safe in protected areas, and support a myriad of leisure activities such as recreational fishing, diving and surfing. No wonder eight in ten Aussies live near the beach. Yet threats to marine ecosystems are becoming more intense and widespread the world over. New maps show that only 13% of the oceans ... Read More »