Science, Technology and Innovation

Super worm moon – in pictures

Wednesday night’s rare occurrence of a super worm moon coincided with the equinox. Matt Fidler The Guardian  The name is a nod to the emergence of worms from the soil around the time of the March full moon The super worm equinox moon rises behind the Statue of Liberty in New York. Photograph: Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu/Getty Images… Super worm moon – in… Read More »

Huge fish found washed up along the Coorong near mouth of the Murray River

A sunfish has been found washed ashore near the mouth of the Murray River in South Australia over the weekend, and one expert believes it is the Mola mola species. By Camron Slessor ABC The gigantic fish is known for its sheer size and odd body shape, often distinguished by its flattened body and fins. A photo of the creature was posted on social media on Monday, with two fishermen standing over it on the sand. Linette Grzelak, who posted the ... Read More »

Walking Is About More Than 10,000 Steps – Here’s How It Can Change Your Life

Got a pair of shoes that don’t rub? You’re ready. Rachel Moss HuffPost It’s something many of us take for granted, but the simple act of walking has the power to transform both our physical and mental health. The cheapest form of exercise you’ll find, walking doesn’t require specialist boots, trainers or fitness clothing. If you’ve got a pair of shoes that don’t rub, you’re ready. Still need a little convincing? Read on to find out more about the proven benefits of putting ... Read More »

A Mass Shooting of, and for, the Internet

Before entering a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, the site of one of the deadliest mass murders in the country’s history, the accused gunman paused to endorse a YouTube star in a video that appeared to capture the shooting. Kevin Roose The New York Times “Remember, lads, subscribe to PewDiePie,” he said. To an untrained eye, this would have seemed like a bizarre detour. But the people watching the video stream recognized it as something entirely different: a meme. Like ... Read More »

Music was ubiquitous in Ancient Greece

Now we can hear how it actually sounded Much of what we think of as Ancient Greek poetry, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, was composed to be sung, frequently with the accompaniment of musical instruments. aeon And while the Greeks left modern classicists many indications that music was omnipresent in society – from vases decorated with lyres, to melodic notation preserved on stone – the precise character and contours of the music has long been considered irreproducible. However, the UK ... Read More »

The mental health crisis among America’s youth is real – and staggering

The first signs of a problem started to emerge around 2014: More young people said they felt overwhelmed and depressed. College counseling centers reported sharp increases in the number of students seeking… Jean Twenge The Conversation Even as studies were showing increases in symptoms of depression and in suicide among adolescents since 2010, some researchers called the concerns overblown and claimed there simply isn’t enough good… The idea that there’s an epidemic in anxiety or depression among youth “is simply ... Read More »

Emma Haruka Iwao smashes pi world record with Google help

The value of the number pi has been calculated to a new world record length of 31 trillion digits, far past the previous record of 22 trillion. Zoe Kleinman BBC Emma Haruka Iwao, a Google employee from Japan, found the new digits with the help of the company’s cloud computing service. Pi is the number you get when you divide a circle’s circumference by its diameter. The first digits, 3.14, are well known but the number is infinitely long. Extending ... Read More »

‘No More Winter’: How Hot Your Home Town Will Be In 30 Years

Do you hate winter? Well, you may soon not have one. And a new tool developed by the Australian National University shows exactly how warm things are going to get. Victoria Quested 10daily Your Climate 2050 — developed by academics from ANU’s SoA&D and the Climate Change Institute —  shows how many degrees the average temperature will rise in more than 4,000 locations by the year 2050. It’s a tool designed to communicate the impacts of climate change to the average ... Read More »

The UK’s First Specialist Medical Cannabis Clinic Has Opened

Bosses at the clinic say it will provide a lifeline to those experiencing chronic pain. HuffPost Press Association The UK’s first specialist medical cannabis clinic has opened in Greater Manchester. It follows the Government announcement that specialist doctors could prescribe cannabis products to patients for medicinal use from November. The decisions by medics need to be made on a case-by-case basis and only when the patient has an unmet special clinical need that cannot be met by licensed products. The ... Read More »

Human memory: How we make, remember, and forget memories

As we access a memory, many parts of our brains rapidly talk to each other, represented here by colorized fibers. Michael Gresko National Geographic Human memory happens in many parts of the brain at once, and some types of memories stick around longer than others. From the moment we are born, our brains are bombarded by an immense amount of information about ourselves and the world around us. So, how do we hold on to everything we’ve learned and experienced? ... Read More »

It took scientists seven days and a ‘global collaboration’ to figure out what fish this is

A rare hoodwinker sunfish that washed ashore at a Californian beach left scientists baffled when they could not identify it. Alexis Moran ABC An intern at the University of California had spotted the 2.1-metre fish at the Coal Oil Point Natural Reserve. Researchers turned to social media for help to identify the creature through a series of photos posted on the Coal Oil Point Facebook page in late February. It was there that the sunfish was identified by marine scientist ... Read More »

‘The last moments were beautiful’: Wife remembers firefighter who died at Swiss euthanasia clinic

When Christine Thornton said goodbye to her husband at a euthanasia clinic in Switzerland last week, he turned to her, told her he loved her, and said, “I’m going now”. Simone Fox Koob WAtoday They had spent four days by each other’s side, having coffee in Basel’s picturesque old town, eating cheese in the Swiss Alps and visiting the border so her husband could say he’d been to France. “Troy said to me it was a lovely way to spend ... Read More »

New clues to the lost tomb of Alexander the Great discovered in Egypt

Excavations in Alexandria’s ancient royal quarter provide intriguing hints to the famous conqueror’s final resting place. By Erin Blakemore National Geographic It was the last hour of the last day of a long, frustrating dig, and Calliope Limneos-Papakosta was ready to go home. For 14 years the Greek archaeologist had been scouring Shallalat Gardens, a public park in the heart of Alexandria, Egypt, for traces of Alexander the Great, the ancient conqueror-turned-pharaoh who gave the city his name. Now it ... Read More »

Life on Mars: my 15 amazing years with Oppy, NASA’s record-breaking rover

“It’s getting dark, my batteries are running low.” With this final poignant message, the most successful mission to Mars – originally planned to last 90 days – ended after 15 years, in a dust storm in June 2018. Christian Schroeder The Conversation Despite efforts to re-establish contact with its solar-powered rover “Oppy”, NASA declared the mission over on February 13 2019. The little robotic geologist had transmitted thousands of images from the surface of the planet, transforming our understanding of ... Read More »

China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise

The Chinese authorities turned to a Massachusetts company and a prominent Yale researcher as they built an enormous system of surveillance and control Sui-Lee Wee The New York Times BEIJING — The authorities called it a free health check. Tahir Imin had his doubts. They drew blood from the 38-year-old Muslim, scanned his face, recorded his voice and took his fingerprints. They didn’t bother to check his heart or kidneys, and they rebuffed his request to see the results. “They ... Read More »

The AI Road to Serfdom?

Estimates of job losses in the near future due to automation range from 9% to 47%, and jobs themselves are becoming ever more precarious. Robert Skidelsky Project Syndicate Should we trust the conventional economic narrative according to which machines inevitably raise workers’ living standards? LONDON – Surveys from round the world show that people want secure jobs. At the same time, they have always dreamed of a life free from toil. The “rise of the robots” has made the tension between these ... Read More »