Study

Migration is a growing issue, but it remains a challenge to define who actually is a migrant

According to the United Nations, more people live in a country other than their place of birth today than ever before. Authors: The Conversations The 2017 migration statistics show that about 34 people out of every 1,000 lived away from their place of birth. This number was over 31 in 2010, and 28 in 2000. Although the number of migrants is expected to grow, a clear understanding of contemporary migration remains a challenge. Defining who is a migrant This challenge ... Read More »

Alarm after Discovery of Plastic Fish!

After a study carried out recently by Nefertiti Sibaja, a student of biological sciences of the National University of Costa Rica (UNA), serious remains of plastic waste were found in the fish of our coast. MENAFN – The Costa Rica News It is a circumstance that, once again, ignites the alarms of the authorities. Prior to this research, UNA has been emphatic in developing a series of activities and research where a large amount of micro-plastic has been found in ... Read More »

How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears

Climate change affects all life on Earth, but it poses unique challenges for aquatic species. Karin Limburg The Conversation For example, as water warms it holds less dissolved oxygen than cooler water. As a result, the world’s oceans, coastal seas, estuaries, rivers and lakes are undergoing a process known as “deoxygenation.” When dissolved oxygen levels fall to about 2 milligrams per liter – compared to a normal range of roughly 5 to 10 mg/L – many aquatic organisms become severely ... Read More »

Australia’s ethnic face is changing, and so are our blood types

It’s often said that no matter who we are, “we all bleed red”. But although our blood may be the same colour, we’re as individual on the inside as we are on the surface. Authors: The Conversation Just like our background determines the way we look, where we come from is one of the major factors that influences the make up of our blood. About half of people living in Australia today were either born overseas, or have a parent ... Read More »

Up to a million species are at risk of annihilation – UN report

Sixth wave of extinction dawns as planet’s life-support systems near danger zone Kevin O’Sullivan The Irish Times The destruction of nature threatens humanity at least as much as human-induced climate change, a global report on species loss will warn on Monday. Complied by hundreds of leading specialists on biodiversity loss, the report will provide evidence that the planet’s life-support systems are approaching a danger zone for humanity. Up to a million species are at risk of annihilation, many within decades, ... Read More »

End to Aids in sight as huge study finds drugs stop HIV transmission

Paper says risk between male partners is zero if virus fully suppressed by antiretrovirals Sarah Boseley and Hannah Devlin The Guardian An end to the Aids epidemic could be in sight after a landmark study found men whose HIV infection was fully suppressed by antiretroviral drugs had no chance of infecting their partner. The success of the medicine means that if everyone with HIV were fully treated, there would be no further infections. Among nearly 1,000 male couples across Europe ... Read More »

Majority of voters want action on women’s issues, new polling shows

A majority of voters believe childcare should be a tax deductible expense, that many of our politicians are sexist, that women should comprise at least half of parliamentarians, and that the… Jacqueline Maley Brisbane Times The survey of 1065 voters, split almost evenly between men and women, commissioned by independent lobby group WomenVote and conducted by YouGov Galaxy, shows large… Seventy-one per cent believe the government should be doing more to address the gender pay gap, and 75 per cent ... Read More »

Global inequality is 25% higher than it would have been in a climate-stable world

Those least responsible for global warming will suffer the most. Poorer countries – those that have contributed far less to climate change – tend to be situated in warmer regions, where additional warming causes the most devastation. Nicholas Beuret The Conversation Extreme weather events such as Syria’s prolonged drought, South Asia’s catastrophic monsoon floods, and Cyclone Idai in South-East Africa, the third deadliest cyclone on record, are becoming more likely and more severe. These events are disproportionately bringing death, displacement, ... Read More »

Being BAME often means being over qualified and under paid – here’s how pay reporting could help

As companies with more than 250 employees submit their gender pay figures to the government for the second year in a row, it’s become an increasingly accepted way to combat the gender pay gap. Tolu Olarewaju The Conversation Similar plans are being considered for ethnicity pay. This is because the UK government’s Race Disparity Audit has showed widely varying outcomes in areas including education, employment, health and criminal justice between Britain’s white and ethnic minority populations. Mandatory pay reporting could ... Read More »

Children face reduction in life expectancy of 20 months ‘due to air pollution’

New research shows how a child born today could be affected by highly polluted air The Irish Times The life expectancy of a child born today will be reduced by an average of 20 months due to health damage caused by air pollution, researchers said on Wednesday. In South Asia, where air pollution levels are highest, the life expectancy for children born in countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh is forecast to fall by more than 30 months, according to the annual State of Global Air ... Read More »

Climate Change Drives Collapse Of Baby Corals In Great Barrier Reef

The catastrophic die-off from recent ocean heat waves severely affected the reef’s ability to produce new corals and bounce back. Chris DÁngelo HuffPost The deadly back-to-back bleaching events that hammered Australia’s Great Barrier Reef in 2016 and 2017 led to a collapse in the recruitment of new corals, severely affecting the ecosystem’s ability to recover from the devastation. That’s according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, which found that the number of juvenile corals that settled ... Read More »

A randomised route to better government

An evaluator-general would help policymakers understand which policies work, and which to drop. Andrew Leigh The Canberra Times In the mid-1990s, researchers embarked on a massive clinical trial. More than 16,000 post-menopausal women volunteered to be assigned randomly to a treatment group, receiving hormone-replacement therapy, or to a control group. Many expected that the study would back the common view – based on observational studies – that taking estrogen plus progestin was good for these women’s health. Five years in, ... Read More »

The dying art of conversation – has technology killed our ability to talk face-to-face?

What with Facetime, Skype, Whatsapp and Snapchat, for many people, face-to-face conversation is used less and less often. Melanie Chan The Conversation These apps allow us to converse with each other quickly and easily – overcoming distances, time zones and countries. We can even talk to virtual assistants such as Alexa, Cortana or Siri – commanding them to play our favourite songs, films, or tell us the weather forecast. Often these ways of communicating reduce the need to speak to ... Read More »

Big gods came after the rise of civilisations, not before, finds study using huge historical database

When you think of religion, you probably think of a god who rewards the good and punishes the wicked. Authors: The Conversation But the idea of morally concerned gods is by no means universal. Social scientists have long known that small-scale traditional societies – the kind missionaries used to dismiss as “pagan” – envisaged a spirit world that cared little about the… Their concern was less about whether humans behaved nicely towards one another and more about whether they carried ... Read More »

Walking Is About More Than 10,000 Steps – Here’s How It Can Change Your Life

Got a pair of shoes that don’t rub? You’re ready. Rachel Moss HuffPost It’s something many of us take for granted, but the simple act of walking has the power to transform both our physical and mental health. The cheapest form of exercise you’ll find, walking doesn’t require specialist boots, trainers or fitness clothing. If you’ve got a pair of shoes that don’t rub, you’re ready. Still need a little convincing? Read on to find out more about the proven benefits of putting ... Read More »

The mental health crisis among America’s youth is real – and staggering

The first signs of a problem started to emerge around 2014: More young people said they felt overwhelmed and depressed. College counseling centers reported sharp increases in the number of students seeking… Jean Twenge The Conversation Even as studies were showing increases in symptoms of depression and in suicide among adolescents since 2010, some researchers called the concerns overblown and claimed there simply isn’t enough good… The idea that there’s an epidemic in anxiety or depression among youth “is simply ... Read More »