Multiculturalism

Comment: ‘People actually laughed at a president’: At U.N. speech, Trump suffers the fate he always feared

President Trump has long argued that the United States has been taken advantage of by other nations — a “laughing stock to the entire World” he said on Twitter in 2014 — and his political rise was countenanced on the… David Nakamura The Washington Post But at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Trump got a comeuppance on the world’s biggest stage. Delivering a speech that aimed to establish U.S. “sovereignty” over the whims and needs of other nations, the… ... Read More »

Scott Morrison claims Indigenous voice to parliament would be a third chamber

Prime minister tells Radio National Uluru proposal ‘really is’ a third chamber and must be rejected Paul Karp The Guardian Scott Morrison has rejected the Uluru statement’s call for an Indigenous voice to parliament by claiming that the body would constitute a “third chamber”, a characterisation… In an interview on Radio National on Wednesday the new prime minister signalled there would be no change of policy since Malcolm Turnbull rejected the voice, and even walked back… Asked about the voice ... Read More »

Cosby in cuffs: TV star gets 3 to 10 years for sex assault

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) —At an age when other Hollywood stars are settling into retirement and collecting lifetime-achievement awards, an 81-year-old Bill Cosby was led away to prison in handcuffs Tuesday, sentenced to three to 10… By MARYCLAIRE DALE and MICHAEL R. SISAK, Associated Press / msn The comedian, TV star and breaker of racial barriers became the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison. He was found guilty in April of drugging and sexually assaulting a ... Read More »

Refugees from Venezuela are fleeing to Latin American cities, not refugee camps

More than 2.3 million Venezuelans – roughly 7 percent of the entire population – have fled the country’s political and economic crisis since 2014, the largest human displacement in Latin America’s history. Robert Muggah The Conversation Earlier this year as many as 5,000 Venezuelans crossed the border every day, most of them seeking safety in poor cities and towns in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Impromptu refugee camps are springing up in towns across South America, fueling anxieties that ... Read More »

China cracks down on religion, crosses burned at Christian churches, Xi Jinping photos installed

China has intensified its crackdown on religion, with images emerging of crosses being burned and destroyed at Christian churches. By Ian Burrows and Bang Xiao ABC The crosses are said to often be replaced with objects such as the Chinese flag and photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping and former Communist Party leader Mao Zedong. In one video posted on Twitter earlier this month, fire is seen engulfing the cross at the Chinese Christian Church in Xinxiang city, in the ... Read More »

The United Nations has entered its darkest hour

If the United Nations were a stock or an index fund, you might want to short it. Founded in 1945 to “maintain international peace and security,” the UN in recent years has been powerless to stop slaughter in Syria, Yemen and Myanmar. James Gibney Brisbane Times Bloomberg Civil conflicts are nearing post-Cold War highs. The number of displaced people has hit a new record. After decades of improvement, more of the… The gap between what the UN seeks and receives ... Read More »

So Much Like Home: From Palestine To Central Australia

In December 2016, New Matilda editor Chris Graham travelled to the Middle East, his first visit to Palestine. What he found shocked him, but not so much for the depth of poverty and oppression, but rather for how much it reminded him of the… Chris Graham New Matilda In his 2013 documentary Utopia, Australian journalist John Pilger looks at the state of Aboriginal Australia following the Northern Territory intervention, a cynical government policy launched in the lead up to the… The ... Read More »

This pains me, but it’s time to compromise on Australia’s cruel asylum seeker policy

Vacating the moral high ground is part of ending the most terrible act perpetrated by the Australian state during my lifetime Robert Manne The Guardian In the past 30 years Australia has crafted an almost uniquely cruel asylum seeker policy. Our only competitor is the proudly illiberal Hungary. When Malcolm Turnbull outlined our current policy to Donald Trump in their notorious telephone conversation, the US president was mightily impressed. “You are worse than I am.” No more evidence about the ... Read More »

Seven children, university boss: the work-life balance of Michael Spence

Back in 2013, Michael Spence wrote an awkward letter. A young, artistic Anglican minister had caught his eye, but she was also a PhD student at the university where the widowed father of five was vice-chancellor. Jordan Baker The Sydney Morning Herald A clandestine relationship would be scandalous. So before he could declare his intentions to Jenny Ihn, Spence found himself declaring them to the… “We are not at all romantically involved, [but] we do spend quite a lot of ... Read More »

Behind the breakdown of political consensus

Across Western democracies, the social cohesion that once sustained political consensus has severely eroded. Nathan Gardels The Washington Post A new segregation is emerging as a combined result of the collapse of socializing institutions and the rise of polarizing practices. Mandatory military or civic service is gone in most liberal societies. Universal public education, in which all classes, races and ethnicities mingled, has been relegated to less well-off communities while those who can afford it receive a private education from ... Read More »

Europe’s two-faced migration reality

Migration — like globalization — creates winners and losers. By MIGUEL OTERO-IGLESIAS Politico As European countries grapple with the backlash to immigration, it’s become clear that there’s a growing cognitive dissonance between the global elite and ordinary voters. Immigration has major benefits for both migrants and the host countries, but it’s important to remember that not everybody gains from the phenomenon. Like free trade and finance, migration creates winners and losers. If Europe’s political elite doesn’t come up with ways to compensate low-skilled ... Read More »

Should all Nobel Prizes be canceled for a year?

If you ever meet someone who claims to have nearly won the Nobel Prize in mathematics, walk away: You’re dealing with a deeply delusional individual. Brian Keating The Conversation While there isn’t, and has never been, a Nobel in mathematics, the desire to claim Nobel-worthiness is sensible, for no matter the field, it is the world’s most prestigious accolade. The annual prizes are Sweden’s most sacred holiday, bringing out royalty in the arts and sciences and a worldwide audience of ... Read More »

Turkey’s Erdogan to open Cologne mosque in controversial state visit

The Turkish president’s hopes of addressing the German-Turkish community are closer to becoming reality. His upcoming state visit was described as a “betrayal” by journalist Deniz Yücel, who was imprisoned in Turkey. DW Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will officially open a new central mosque in the western German city of Cologne, the Turkish-Islamic organization DITIB confirmed on Tuesday evening. Erdogan will open the mosque at a ceremony at the end of his state visit to Germany, which is set ... Read More »

Housegirl Complicates the Diaspora Narrative

The debut from the Ghanaian British author Michael Donkor explores the life of a domestic worker in London, while rejecting the common impulse to focus on more aspirational immigrant stories. Hannah Giorgis The Atlantic The Ghanaian British author Michael Donkor’s U.S. debut, Housegirl, is full of movement. The novel follows a 17-year-old domestic laborer named Belinda as she travels from Ghana to London. Before the start of the novel, Belinda has already journeyed from her home village to Kumasi, one of ... Read More »

Catastrophe overload? Read philosophers and poetry instead of headlines

For almost two years now, Americans have been confronted daily by ominous tidings. We are living through stressful times. Reading the news feels awful; ignoring it doesn’t feel right either. Rachel Hadas The Conversation Psychologist Terri Apter recently wrote about the “phenomenon in human behavior sometimes described as ‘the hive switch,’ where “catastrophic events eliminate selfishness, conflict and competitiveness, rendering humans as… But if hurricanes, earthquakes or volcanoes trigger the hive switch, does this principle hold for man-made catastrophes? What ... Read More »

In Esi Edugyan’s Novel ‘Washington Black,’ a Slave Escapes by Hot-Air Balloon

(This book was selected as one of The New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of 2018. For the rest of the list, click here.) By Colm Toibin The New York Times WASHINGTON BLACK By Esi Edugyan 334 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $26.95 When the novel “Washington Black” opens, it is 1830 and the young George Washington Black, who narrates his own story, is a slave on a Barbados sugar plantation called Faith, protected, or at least watched over, by an ... Read More »