Photography

Picturing Baghdad

Despite their traumatic history, Iraqis are finding individual and civic solutions to their country’s political failures. Julie David de Lossy ICG Crisis Group photographer Julie David de Lossy visited Baghdad in October-November 2018 and returned with portraits of its people’s search for normalcy. Iraq has endured decades of sanctions, war, invasion, regime change and dysfunctional government. These span Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship, a devastating eight-year war with Iran in the 1980s and crippling UN sanctions throughout the 1990s. Those difficult years ... Read More »

Photos of the Paris “Yellow Vest” Riots

A third weekend of protest in Paris, France,  turned violent on Saturday, as thousands of “yellow vests” (gilets jaunes) battled with riot police, burned cars, and damaged property. Alan Taylor The Atlantic The protest movement began largely focused on anger toward rising fuel taxes, but has grown into a wider anti-government movement. Paris police reported that 133 people were injured in the riots, and more than 400 were arrested… Photos of the… Read More »

Best photos of 2018

National Geographic’s 100 best images of the year—curated from 107 photographers, 119 stories, and more than two million photographs… PHOTOGRAPH BY BRIAN SKERRY BY SUSAN GOLDBERG, EDITOR IN CHIEF CURATED BY SARAH LEEN, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY SARAH LEEN HAS a job most people in the world would envy. She looks at photographs for a living. And not just any photographs — National Geographic photographs. As our Director of Photography, Leen estimates she has looked at as many images “as there are stars in the sky,” ... Read More »

Magnum China: Panoramic portrait of a global superpower

Photographers at Magnum Photos have had a long-standing cultural engagement and fascination with China. BBC Co-founders Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson first covered the country on photography assignments in the 1930s and 40s, marking the beginning of a relationship with the country that has continued throughout the decades. Magnum’s photos provide a panoramic portrait of China and its people through the changes and upheavals in its recent history. Here is a small selection from the… Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1949 Henri Cartier-Bresson’s… ... Read More »

Lynsey Addario on maternal mortality

Renowned for her fearless coverage of conflicts, Addario reflects on the experience of documenting a silent epidemic of epic proportions Words: Hannah Abel-Hirsch British Journal of Photography Throughout the Wellcome Photography Prize submission period, British Journal of Photography is profiling photographers who are exploring the importance of health in society and the… In line with theMedicine in Focus category, BJP spoke to Lynsey Addario about her series on maternal mortality in Sierra… Lynsey Addario is no stranger to conflict. The Pulitzer Prize-winning ... Read More »

Ten photos that changed how we see human rights

Nearly 70 years ago, in December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Jane Lydon The Conversation At this time, the UN’s cultural arm, UNESCO, sought to harness the “universal language” of photography to communicate the new system of human rights globally, across barriers of race and language. UNESCO curated the ground-breaking “Human Rights Exhibition” in 1949, seeking to create a sense of a universal humanity through photographs. It sent portable photo albums around ... Read More »

The Indian tribe that gave up hunting to save forests

A tribe in the north-eastern Indian state of Nagaland gave up their ancient tradition of hunting to protect wildlife. Photographer Sayan Hazra chronicles life in the village years after it banished the practice. BBC At one time, 76-year-old Chaiyievi Zhiinyii was a skilled hunter. But he stopped hunting in 2001. The Khonoma tribe gave up what was an important source of livelihood some 20 years ago in order to create a more stable ecosystem for future generations. For centuries, many ... Read More »

Sinkholes: When the Earth Opens Up

The ground beneath our feet, our highways, and our cities appears to be very sturdy. Alan Taylor The Atlantic But, on rare occasions, that solid ground can simply open up without warning, dropping whatever it was supporting into an unpredictably deep hole. An undiscovered cavern or abandoned mine might collapse, or a broken water main or heavy storm might cause erosion, until the surface becomes a thin shell that drops away all at once. Sinkholes can be anywhere from a ... Read More »

The stacks of cash needed to buy basic goods tell Venezuela’s insane inflation story

In a desperate bid to curb its runaway inflation rate, Venezuela has lopped five zeros from its currency. Edmund Heaphy Quartz The move yesterday, which came along with a 95% devaluation of the currency—known as the “strong bolívar”—was also accompanied by a hike in gas prices and a 3,000% increase in the minimum wage. New banknotes for the currency, now called the the “sovereign bolívar”, were introduced. The redenominated bolívar is now pegged to the petro, a state-run cryptocurrency that doesn’t ... Read More »

Photos of the Week: Sun Biter, Solar Probe, Belgian Bovines

Flowers carpet Brussels, an alt-right rally is met with overwhelming opposition in Washington, D.C., City2Surf takes off in Sydney, the Women’s Softball World Championship is underway in Japan, a farewell is bid to Aretha Franklin, the Obon prayer is made in Japan, abandoned share bikes find homes in Germany, record-setting hot dogs are lined up in Mexico, a cardboard Viking church collapses in Liverpool, a bridge collapses in Italy, a newborn gibbon shows off in Prague, and much… Alan Taylor ... Read More »

A man on a mission to capture the Great Barrier Reef

Welcome to the underwater world of photographer Gary Cranitch who has spent decades documenting the Great Barrier Reef and work of scientists trying to protect it. Tony Moore Brisbane Times It is called a mantis shrimp and “pound for pound” it is one of the strongest creatures on planet Earth. It is one of the Queensland Museum photographer Gary Cranitch’s favourite images from his extensive portfolio. “It goes back quite a few years and I probably photographed it on Heron ... Read More »

Revisiting Nelson Mandela’s roots: a photographic exploration

South African photographer, Bonile Bam, decided that he wanted to tell a different Nelson Mandela story by documenting the landscape and physical setting in which Mandela lived as a boy. Raymond Suttner The Conversation Like Mandela, Bam also grew up in the Eastern Cape province. The entirely black and white photographs will form part of an upcoming exhibition in Johannesburg called Mandela’s Roots (revisited). Raymond Suttner interviewed Bam on his photography and how he came to develop the Mandela exhibition, ... Read More »

Photos of the Devastating Wildfires Outside Athens, Greece

Strong winds drove wildfires across the villages, hills, and forests around Athens, Greece, starting on July 23, with authorities blaming the fires for at least 74 deaths. Alan Taylor The Atlantic More than 300 firefighters were quickly mobilized to the area, but many residents scrambled to safety on their own—with hundreds racing to the shore to evacuate in small boats, or to try to swim away from advancing flames. While most of the fire has now been contained, the risk ... Read More »

Photos of the Week: Atomic Art, Moon Pool, Giant Iceberg

The Royal Air Force celebrates its centennial in London, World Cup emotions run high in Russia and around the world, a chili pepper eating contest takes place in China, the Running of the Bulls begins in Spain, a leopard gets a check-up in the Netherlands, Tour de France riders pass through stage six, flamingos stride through a lake in Turkey, and much more… Alan Taylor The Atlantic Photos of the… Read More »

Donald Trump makes Time cover again, this time over US-Mexico border immigration crisis

Donald Trump has got himself another Time magazine cover, but it’s probably not one he’ll be rushing to get his hands on. ABC The iconic American weekly news magazine published its latest front page and it was quickly being shared across the internet. It draws on the immigration crisis on the US-Mexico border and features the President looking down over a crying toddler. That crying toddler is a two-year-old Honduran, who was captured in a photo with her mother that ... Read More »

How a photo research project gives refugee women a voice in resettlement policy

Between 2000 and 2017, the number of refugees and asylum seekers globally increased from 16 to 26 million. Authors: The Conversation In 2016, women made up 49% of global refugees. Dominant representations of refugee women are that of vulnerable and helpless victims. This disregards women’s agency, voice, and deep desire for education and social enterprise. Australia’s refugee intake is expected to increase to 18,750 in 2018-19, the largest intake in 30 years. In 1989, Australia established a “Woman at Risk” ... Read More »