Arts & Culture

Museum of Australian Democracy exhibition looks at migration through Holocaust survivors’ eyes

The story begins with a toy koala – furry, life-sized and huggable – and ends with the poignant reminders of the bottomless traumas of the Holocaust. Sally Pryor The Canberra Times But in exploring the different experiences of migration to Australia, an exhibition at the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House in Canberra has a single shining theme: human resilience. In 1949, an eight-year-old girl named Isobel Saxelby was presented with a toy koala when she arrived in ... Read More »

‘Lost’ ancient Mexican city had as many buildings as Manhattan, laser map shows

‘If you do the maths, all of a sudden you are talking about 40,000 building foundations up there’ Jeff Farrell The Independent A “lost” Mexican city built by rivals to the Aztecs has as many buildings as Manhattan and was home to around 100,000 people, according to new research. The sprawling urban centre of Angamuco which was part of the Purépecha empire that peaked in the 16th century was detected by an aerial laser mapping technique called the Lidar system. An aircraft beamed out laser pulses and experts ... Read More »

Pushing back: why it’s time for women to rewrite the story

Poe, Updike, Roth, Mailer: many male authors have contributed to a culture in which the credibility of women is undermined. It’s time to put a stop to the gaslighting, writes Sarah Churchwell The Guardian In 1938 a play debuted at the Richmond theatre, which opens with a Victorian husband telling his wife that though she has been “very good lately”, she mustn’t “read meanings into everything” or “imagine things”. “Is it possible you’re beginning to see my point of view?” she ... Read More »

Neighbourhood living rooms – we can learn a lot from European town squares

Australian urban design has historically focused on providing and improving access to public green spaces. As cities increase in density, this is a crucial part of creating healthy, engaged communities. Dina Bacvic The Conversation But Australian urban designers often fail to consider the “other half” of public space – the town square. Public squares or plazas were, and are, the centres of daily public life in many European towns and cities. Today they still influence the perception of place and ... Read More »

When citizens set the budget: lessons from ancient Greece

Today elected representatives take the tough decisions about public finances behind closed doors. In doing so, democratic politicians rely on the advice of financial bureaucrats, who, often, cater to the political needs of the elected government. Authors: The Conversation Politicians rarely ask voters what they think of budget options. They are no better at explaining the reasons for a budget. Explanations are usually no more than vacuous phrases, such as “jobs and growth” or “on the move”. They never explain ... Read More »

Ai Weiwei on the project that awoke his political voice – The Start podcast

The artist and activist tells how investigating schoolchildren’s deaths in the Sichuan earthquake of 2008 spawned his mammoth installation, Remembering Produced by Eva Krysiak with sound design by Chris Wood and original music by Stephen Fiske The Guardian In 2008, an earthquake devastated Sichuan province in China, claiming the lives of more than 69,000 people. Following accusations from parents that substandard construction caused the collapse of schools across in the region, the artist Ai Weiwei set upon a political investigation that would name every missing student ... Read More »

Capitalism isn’t an ideology — it’s an operating system

Bhu Srinivasan researches the intersection of capitalism and technological progress. Today’s TED Talk Instead of thinking about capitalism as a firm, unchanging ideology, he suggests that we should think of it as an operating system — one that needs upgrades to keep up with innovation, like the impending take-off of drone delivery services. Learn more about the past and future of the free market (and a potential coming identity crisis for the United States’ version of capitalism) with this quick, ... Read More »

The curious and compelling portraits of Hanna Putz

With her distinct photographic style, the Austrian photographer is uniquely positioned to capture the different characters of her sitters Sponsored by Austrian National Tourist Office Austria. The Art of Discovery, an exclusive British Journal of Photography commission supported by the Austrian National Tourist Office as part of its Austria. The Art of Discoveryproject, is now open for entries! The winning photographer will travel to Austria to… For the second in a series of editorials exploring the work of Austrian photographers, we spoke ... Read More »

Emotional intelligence: What it is and why you need it

When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70% of the time. Travis Bradberry World Economic Forum This anomaly threw a massive wrench into what many people had always assumed was the sole source of success—IQ. Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. Emotional ... Read More »

Guide to the classics: Sappho, a poet in fragments

For those who have read the fragmented remains of the Greek poet, Sappho the loss of most of her poetic corpus is something to regret. Marguerite Johnson The Conversation With a mere two complete poems extant from nine books of verse, much is left to the imagination in the reconstruction of the output (and life) of this most mysterious of ancient poets. In a world dominated by male voices whose view of life, the universe and everything was the loudest and most ... Read More »

The Female Quran Experts Fighting Radical Islam in Morocco

“The women scholars here are even more important than men.” DINA TEMPLE-RASTON The Atlantic Morocco is in a region vulnerable to terrorist recruitment, but it hasn’t had a significant attack on its own soil since 2011, when terrorists bombed a Marrakesh café. Yet ethnic Moroccans have been at the center of ISIS attacks in Europe. The only alleged survivor of the 2015 Paris rampage is a Frenchman of Moroccan origin; his trial began last week. The men behind the Brussels ... Read More »

Archaeologists trace lost settlements of Glencoe destroyed after 1692 massacre

Archaeologists are to trace the lost settlements of the Glencoe Massacre for the first time and place the human story of the atrocity back into one of Scotland’s most visited landscapes. Alison Campsie The Scotsman National Trust for Scotland has carried out initial survey work at three former settlements which fall within its property at the glen with more detailed studies due to follow. Glencoe was the scene of one of Scotland’s most infamous murders of the clan era when ... Read More »

Who is Asma Jahangir ?

Known for maintaining a resolute stance in the face of extreme pressure and opposition, Jahangir will be remembered as a champion for the disenfranchised The Indian Express Eminent lawyer and human rights activist Asma Jahangir passed away in Lahore after she suffered a cardiac arrest on Sunday, according to Pakistan media. She was 66. “Asma suffered heart attack today morning and she was rushed to Hameed Latif Hospital Lahore where she breathed her last. Doctors tried to save her life ... Read More »

How Reading Changes Your Brain Can Actually Make You A Better & More Positive Person

I’m in grad school right now, and we’ve been reading three of Irish writer Samuel Beckett’s very challenging novels. By Annakeara Stinson Elite Daily TBH, the reading sort of makes me feel like my mind is crawling through a maze to understand the words, simply because the prose is so dense, and the ideas are pretty damn existential. While I enjoy it, it also legit makes my brain hurt as I’m taking notes and trying to process everything. But you know ... Read More »

Tony Wright’s column: Life is brief. Pluck the day and share it with friends

A valued mate is celebrating his 70th birthday next month. He’s been insisting I attend the dinner he is giving to mark this venerable achievement. Tony Wright The Age The thing is that he has taken himself across the world, and is living in the exotic city of Tangier, Morocco. Too far, I figured. Too difficult. Haven’t got the time. Or the spare cash. Dithering, it became easy to offer excuses to myself. And yet. My friend will never have ... Read More »

Celebrated and beloved Age journalist Michael Gordon dies aged 62

Michael Gordon, a giant of Australian journalism and one of The Age’smost loved, respected and lauded writers, has died at the age of 62. Debbie Cuthbertson The Sydney Morning Herald He is believed to have suffered a heart attack while taking part in an ocean swim at Cowes, on Phillip Island, on Saturday morning. He was pulled from the water and brought to shore shortly before 10.30am. Despite the best efforts of emergency services, who spent more than an hour trying ... Read More »