Arts & Culture

The old model for motivating employees is dying. It’s time for a replacement

Six-figure salaries and free lattes in the break room are enticing, but corporate workers increasingly are seeking something more. Knowledge@Wharton World Economic Forum They want a sense of purpose, a feeling of true camaraderie, and a belief that they are having an impact within the company and outside of it. That’s where good leadership can make all the difference, says Fred Kofman, an adviser in leadership development at Google and former vice president of development at LinkedIn. His latest book, ... Read More »

Happiness helps football players do better, and it could help economies too

World Cup football teams with a higher proportion of players smiling in their official portraits have scored more goals on average in all group phases since 1970. Authors: The Conversation The authors of this study argue that smiling is a reflection of confidence. Greater confidence results in a greater capacity to overcome complex situations and score more goals. We decided to explore whether this same smiling-creativity link holds for entire societies by looking at the relationship between happiness and creative… ... Read More »

Reflections on how far ATSI women in law have come

With NAIDOC Week kicking off this week, Lawyers Weekly spoke with two trailblazing women lawyers about their experiences, what issues are still being faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in law, and… Jerome Doraisamy The theme for this year’s NAIDOC Week is “Because of her, we can”, and Kate George — who was the first Aboriginal person to study law at The University of Western Australia and was WA’s… “When I commenced my tertiary studies, there were very ... Read More »

Abortion and the human person

The fall of Christendom and the rise of secularism has profound consequences for our understanding of the human person. Peter Sellick OnLineOpinion The latter would have it that humanity is but a species among species. This is so because nature is taken as the primary source of our being. Evolutionary theory and the discovery that we share a large amount of our DNA with other species underlines the point. Human beings are biological. The other view of humanity is that, ... Read More »

Massive Turkey-funded mosque stirs unease in secular north Cyprus

Many local residents see imposing structure as part of Erdogan’s efforts to cement control over territory. ‘It symbolizes the Islamist mentality. It’s not an innocent thing’ Dylan Collins The Times of Israel NICOSIA, Cyprus (AFP) — In the flat sunbaked fields north of the Cypriot capital Nicosia, a huge Turkey-funded mosque opening this week has caused a stir in the largely secular Muslim society. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is to attend the opening ceremony, expected to take place on ... Read More »

Booker Prize: tradition of multilingual writers seems to be dying out – more’s the pity

Is it a coincidence that J.K. Rowling studied French and Classics? Or that Shakespeare wrote passages of dialogue in Welsh and French, suggesting that he was conversant in both? Authors: The Conversation To write successfully in your first language, it can help if you know a second – it is one way of seeing the world from another perspective and making comparisons, which is after all what literature is all about. But what of writers of contemporary literary fiction? Researchers ... Read More »

How do Americans really feel about interracial couples?

According to the most recent U.S. census, approximately 15 percent of all newlywed couples are interracial. Allison Skinner The Conversation More interracial relationships are also appearing in the media – on television, in film and in advertising. These trends suggest that great strides have been made in the roughly 50 years since the Supreme Court struck down anti-miscegenation laws. But as a psychologist who studies racial attitudes, I suspected that attitudes toward interracial couples may not be as positive as ... Read More »

Study examines alcohol’s effects on sexual aggression

A new Aggressive Behavior study has examined alcohol’s “in the moment” effects on sexual aggression, or the acute effects of alcohol on men’s decisions about how to respond to sexual refusals in a dating simulation. EurekAlert! In the study, 62 men in their 20s were randomly assigned to consume alcohol (target breath alcohol level 0.080%) or no alcohol. Participants were encouraged to talk to a simulated woman as if they were on a date, and they made choices from a ... Read More »

Time to honour a historical legend: 50 years since the discovery of Mungo Lady

This month we celebrate an event 50 years ago in western New South Wales that changed the course of Australian history. Jim Bowler The Conversation On July 15, 1968, the discovery of burnt bones on a remote shoreline of an unnamed lake basin began a story, the consequences of which remain sadly unfinished today. It’s the story of a legend, the discovery of Mungo Lady, the first in the series of steps that led to the creation of the Willandra ... Read More »

Can you raise an autistic child to be bilingual – and should you try?

Diagnosed with autism and delayed language development, five-year-old Jose lives with his bilingual English-Spanish family in the UK. Authors: The Conversation In addition to all the important decisions that a family with an autistic child has to take, Jose’s parents must also consider what languages to teach him and how. They would like Jose to learn English so he can make friends and do well at school. But they also value Spanish – the native language of Jose’s mother. The ... Read More »

Monash student, Hazara refugee and human rights advocate wins prestigious Scholarship to Oxford University

Sitarah Mohammadi was eight years old when she first learnt to read and write. Born in Afghanistan, she was told that girls and women were second-class, they had no rights and that they didn’t need an education. Monash University It was only when she escaped to Australia that she was given the chance to go to school, and to realise just how lucky she was. Growing up as a Hazara refugee in Australia has taught this Monash international relations and ... Read More »

If you can only do one thing for your children, it should be shared reading

Reading to children is beneficial in many ways. Books offer a unique opportunity for children to become familiar with new vocabularies; the type of words not often used in day-to-day conversation. Authors: The Conversation Books also provide a context for developing knowledge of abstract ideas for children. When an adult reads a book to a child, they often label pictures, talk about activities in the book, solve problems together and teach them new words and concepts. Reading to very young ... Read More »

Sexual abuse, harassment and discrimination ‘rife’ among Australian academics

Sexual abuse, harassment and discrimination pervade parts of Australian universities, according to survey results released today by the Australian Women’s History Network. Authors: The Conversation Of the 159 academics who completed our voluntary survey, from more than two dozen universities around Australia, 48.7% reported sexual abuse or harassment in the workplace. Sexual or gender-based discrimination were even more common, reported by 66.2% of respondents. Women made up 90.6% of the responses (of these, 50% reported abuse or harassment and… Sexual ... Read More »

Why do people suddenly ‘get into’ football during the World Cup?

Football fever is once again sweeping the globe. People’s behaviour during the World Cup is very interesting for us psychologists, as we can see many examples of the theories we use in action. Chris Stiff The Conversation Here are five questions you might ask during the tournament – and how psychology would answer them: 1. Why do people suddenly “get into” football during the World Cup, when usually they’re not interested? This change in attitudes has to do with a ... Read More »

The Half-Life of Sexual Abuse in a Holocaust-Survivor Family

Helen Epstein completes her clear-eyed, fearless, taboo-breaking autobiographical trilogy By Irena Klepfisz Tablet Helen Epstein began her career as a journalist with the publication of an article in the Jerusalem Post describing Soviet tanks rolling into Prague. It was 1968 and she was 20 years old. Since then she has become well known and greatly respected not only as a journalist but as a biographer, editor, and Czech translator with a wide range of interests: music and theater, psychoanalysis, and… Among her ... Read More »

One story, two languages: sign and spoken language share the theatre stage

This article was co-authored by Kellye Bensley. Would you go and see a bilingual or multilingual show if you only spoke one of the languages staged? What if by going, you could open your mind not just to a new language, but also a new culture? Authors: The Conversation In New Zealand, it is rare to see theatre performed in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL), and rarer still to see it performed through the hands of a first language user. ... Read More »