Analysis

Fishing is worth more than jobs and profits to Australia’s coastal towns

Many of the iconic coastal villages of Australia have a close association with professional fishing. In New South Wales, towns up and down the coast historically supported fishing fleets which supplied the seafood needs of locals, Sydney and the broader state community. Michelle Voyer  Alistair McIlgorm Kate Barclay  But the NSW fishing industry has changed significantly in the past 30 years, in response to a… Fishing is worth… Read More »

Myanmar’s Peace Process: Getting to a Political Dialogue

After almost 70 years of armed conflict, Myanmar has a rare but fading opportunity to finalise a broad-based, federal settlement. The government must adopt a more flexible approach that allays opposition concerns, and armed groups need to go beyond preliminaries and… Myanmar’s Peace Process… Read More »

Shoring Up the Status Quo at Jerusalem’s Holy Esplanade

Defusing conflict over Jerusalem’s holiest site Even the name of Jerusalem’s holiest site causes fundamental disagreement. For Jews, it is the Temple Mount, for Muslims, the Noble Sanctuary or the Al-Aqsa Mosque. So when the Holy Esplanade looked set to become an… Shoring Up the… Read More »

Ukraine’s Unlucky Town Called Happiness

As great powers debate Russia’s place in the world, its role in eastern Ukraine’s 2-1/2-year-old war, and the Minsk peace process to end it, ordinary people living along the front line in eastern Ukraine are just as worried about many of the local leaders’ Soviet-style habits of governance, corruption and patronage. The small front-line town in eastern Ukraine is called Schastia, or Ukrainian for “Happiness”. Four grandmothers sit outside in the… Ukraine’s Unlucky Town… Read More »

America’s Assad Quandary

An excruciating fact confronts us: it does not necessarily follow that Bashar al-Assad’s departure would improve the situation in Syria. Robert D. Kaplan A PRINCIPAL tenet of realism is that disorder is worse than injustice, since injustice merely means the world is imperfect, whereas … America’s Assad… Read More »

The Quiet Fight for Iran’s Future

The future direction of Iran’s foreign policy is all about internal politics. Farhad Rezaei Iran watchers have puzzled to assess whether the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) that Iran and the… The Quiet Fight… Read More »

US election: New president to face chilly relations with Cold War rivals Russia

For all the bluster and bravado, accusations and denials over tapes and emails, there was a quiet but deadly serious issue raised in the second US presidential debate: what to do about Syria and, more broadly, how to counter Russia in that blighted nation and other places. Analysis By chief foreign correspondent Philip Williams In the past few weeks there has been a steady deterioration in relations between the West and… US election: New… Read More »

Why Russia Fears NATO

Adam Twardowski takes umbrage at arguments that I and other members of the realism and restraint camp have made that NATO’s behavior over the past two decades has exacerbated tensions with Russia. Ted Galen Carpenter He begins his rebuttal with a drive-by smear that is increasingly in vogue among neoconservatives, dismissing such… Why Russia Fears… Read More »

The Economic Disaster Behind Afghanistan’s Mounting Human Crisis

Donors and Afghan state agencies must urgently tackle an economic crisis building up since 2014, when foreign troops started leaving and political instability worsened. The starting point must be a socio-economic assessment of just how big the problems are… The Economic Disaster Behind Afghanistan’s Mounting Human Crisis… Read More »

The War on Hank Greenberg

Greenberg is fighting back not simply for himself but for anyone who believes that we should stand for justice, not prosecutorial tyranny. Lawrence A. Cunningham The downtown New York courtroom where 91-year old Maurice R. (“Hank”) Greenberg began testifying this week has all the… The War on Hank Greenberg… Read More »

Uzbekistan: In Transition

Domestic repression and self-imposed isolation has characterised Uzbekistan for much of the time since its independence in 1991. Following the death of Islam Karimov, the country’s long-time and only post-Soviet president, the outside world must seize a rare opportunity to… Source: Uzbekistan: In Transition | International Crisis Group Read More »