Religion

Cultural Workers in Turkey Prepare for Hunger Strike over Underemployment

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Cultural workers in Turkey are set to go on hunger strike in protest of their unemployment and its endangerment of the country’s vulnerable cultural resources. In reaction to the government’s broken promise to hire 50 workers among the thousands of unemployed cultural heritage professionals, the Association of Culture and Art Workers (Kültür Sanat Emekçileri Derneği, or KSED) is taking desperate measures. If ... Read More »

The Vatican Library’s Amazing Documents Are Finally Online

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The news: The Vatican Library is getting an e-upgrade. The official library of the Holy See is undertaking a massive digitization project designed to upload hundred of thousands of books and images from its physical archives into an online database. As Business Insider reports, nonprofit organization Digita Vaticana Oculus was founded in 2013 with the goal digitizing 80,000 manuscripts. That’s just ... Read More »

These Are The Real Stories Behind Some Of The Most Beautiful Colors In Art

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Manganese black. Yellow ocher. Vermilion. Ultramarine. These pigments sound delicious. Their names are so sharp and elegant, it’s as if the terms emote more meaning than just color. We can smell logwood, taste cochineal, touch mummy brown. There is just something (quite scientifically) alluring about a perfectly saturated glob of paint or an electric mound of powdered hues, especially when ... Read More »

Pope Francis allows Sistine Chapel to be rented out for private corporate event

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Pope Francis has for the first time allowed the Sistine Chapel to be rented out for a private corporate event, with the proceeds to go to charities working with the poor and homeless. The concert, to be performed amid the splendour of Michelangelo’s frescoes on Saturday, will be attended by a select group of about 40 high-paying tourists who have ... Read More »

“Islam turned out to be the religion that appealed to my feminist ideals”

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Would CNN ever run an article entitled, “I’m a feminist, and I converted to Christianity”? Or “I’m a feminist, and I converted to Judaism”? You know the answer. As far as the mainstream media is concerned, proselytizing is only acceptable from one religion only. Anyway, as for feminism in Islam, here is a small sampling: the Qur’an likens a woman ... Read More »

Are we free?

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Neuroscience gives the wrong answer For several millennia, people have worried about whether or not they have free will. What exactly worries them? No single answer suffices. For centuries the driving issue was about God’s supposed omniscience. If God knew what we were going to do before we did it, in what sense were we free to do otherwise? Weren’t ... Read More »

Pictures at an execution: The condemned in art

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A new exhibition aims to humanise condemned prisoners. From the sword to the electric chair, the death penalty has inspired challenging art, writes Jason Farago. One man, before dying, said, “I hope you find it in your heart to forgive me.” Another said, “I’m going to a beautiful place.” A third: “I am innocent, innocent, innocent.” Those were their last ... Read More »

Islamophobia: A Global Threat We’ll Be Fighting For 100 Years

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When Christians are being slaughtered, that’s bad. When Muslims are being slaughtered, we’re indifferent. Tim Robertson explains. Sam Harris and Bill Maher’s most recent tirade against Muslims and their faith is indicative of the global threat posed by Islamophobia. The widespread bigotry is being harnessed and used as justification to persecute Muslims around the world, writes Tim Robertson. It’s unsettling ... Read More »

Saint Demetrios

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The traditional iconography of some of the “warrior” saints of the Orthodox Church has always disconcerted me a little. Saint Eustathios, Saint Minas, Saint George and Saint Dimitrios are invariably depicted in soldier’s armour, something that seems to fit uneasily with the pacifism of Christianity. In some of the nineteenth century, baroque inspired iconography, Saint Dimitrios, patron saint of Thessaloniki, ... Read More »