Science, Technology and Innovation

How long will it take for your job to be automated?

Ulet 2b

We’re often told that machines one day will be able to do our jobs – but when, exactly. is that likely to happen? Richard Gray BBC The world is widely considered to be on the cusp of a fourth industrial revolution – one where machines will be able to do many of the jobs currently performed by humans, and perhaps even do them… It is a future that promises greater efficiency and cheaper services, but one that also could herald ... Read More »

Indian research labs face financial crisis

Fraux 2b

India’s 38 premier scientific laboratories are in a budgetary pinch. A jump in expenditures on salaries, pensions, and perks for government employees, recommended by an advisory commission, is leaving little money for… Sanjay Kumar Science The increase in personnel expenses comes on top of a 2015 call by the government for CSIR to raise 30% to 50% of its total budget itself… The stark reality is that “we will be left with no funds to… Indian research labs… Read More »

Y-chromosomal analysis of Greek Cypriots reveals a primarily common pre-Ottoman paternal ancestry with Turkish Cypriots

Fraux 6f

Genetics can provide invaluable information on the ancestry of the current inhabitants of Cyprus PLOS A Y-chromosome analysis was performed to (i) determine paternal ancestry among the Greek Cypriot (GCy) community in the context of the Central and… Our haplotype-based analysis has revealed that GCy and TCy patrilineages derive primarily from a single gene pool and show very close genetic affinity (low genetic differentiation) to Calabrian Italian and… In terms of more recent (past millennium) ancestry, as… Y-chromosomal analysis of… ... Read More »

A Breakthrough AI Can Now Predict Which Babies Will Develop Autism

Fete 4d

Identifying Autism A study published in Science Transitional Medicine has found that doctors can predict which babies will develop autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by the age of two with an astonishing 96 percent success… Tom Ward Futurism The test uses a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and machine-learning algorithms. The study took brain scans of 59 “sibs” (the younger siblings of children with ASD), who’s chances of getting the… A Breakthrough AI… Read More »

Even moderate drinking can damage the brain, claim researchers

Dren 2b

Moderate alcohol consumption can impair cognitive function, says study, countering suggestions that low levels of drinking can help protect the brain Nicola Davis  The Guardian Drinking even moderate amounts of alcohol can damage the brain and impair cognitive function over time, researchers have claimed. While heavy drinking has previously been linked to memory problems and dementia, previous studies have suggested low levels of drinking could help protect the brain. But the new… Even moderate drinking… Read More »

What Happens When You Die?

Mullu 6f

We watch our loved ones’ age and die and assume that’s the end of the story. We believe in death because we’ve been taught we die. Biocentrism Also, of course, because we associate ourselves with our body and we know bodies die. But biocentrism — a new theory of everything — tells us death may not be the terminal event we think. Amazingly, if you add life and consciousness to the equation, you can explain some of the biggest puzzles ... Read More »

Prostate cancer trial stuns researchers: ‘It’s a once in a career feeling’

Glen 1b

Study with ‘powerful results’ finds that combining two existing therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37% Jessica Glenza in Chicago, Illinois The Guardian Combining two existing prostate cancer therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37%, according to a study presented at the world’s largest… The new findings could change how doctors first approach treatment of prostate… Prostate cancer trial… Read More »

MIT issues statement regarding research on Paris Agreement

MIT 1a logo LLLL

MIT issued the following statement on Thursday, June 1 2017. A set of talking points circulated in support of President Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement included this statement: “The [Paris] deal also accomplishes LITTLE for the climate MIT “According to researchers at MIT, if all member nations met their obligations, the impact on the climate would be negligible. The impacts have… The researchers in MIT’s Joint Program on the Science and MIT issues statement… Read More »

This Machine Just Started Sucking CO2 Out Of The Air To Save Us From Climate Change

Who 3c

Climeworks carbon capture device will take the gas from the air and sell it or store it in the ground. By Adele Peters  FastCompany Now we just need a few hundred thousand more–as quickly as possible. Sitting on top of a waste incineration facility near Zurich, a new carbon capture plant is now sucking CO2 out of the air to sell to its first customer… This Machine Just… Read More »

How we can help refugee kids to thrive in Australia

Flau 7g

When we think about refugee children’s health, we tend to assume bad news. But refugee children are highly resilient. Karen Zwi The Conversation This means they can thrive, mature and develop despite poor circumstances, and can adapt despite severe and long-term hardship. Our newly published research is the first of its kind to track the long… How we can… Read More »

Kids’ vitamin gummies: unhealthy, poorly regulated and exploitative

Fut 8h

There are many brands of kids’ “gummies” on the market. They are promoted as deliciously flavoured and a great way for growing bodies (and fussy eaters) to get the nutrients they need. Ken Harvey        Eliza Li Rosemary Stanton Stuart Dashper The Conversation The “active” ingredients are usually listed as vitamins, minerals and sometimes omega-3 fats and vegetable powders. They may say “contains sugars” or they may… Kids’ vitamin gummies… Read More »

Inside the quietest place on Earth

Uft 5e

Microsoft has built a chamber so quiet, you can hear the grind of your bones – and it’s helping to fine-tune the next-generation of electronic goods. Richard Gray BBC If LeSalle Munroe stands still for a few moments in his “office”, something unsettling can happen – he can hear the blood rushing around his body and his eyes squelch as… While many people work in places filled with the tip-tap of… Inside the quietest… Read More »

Bacteria Are Evolving To Eat The Plastic We Dump Into The Oceans

Klem 8h

The ocean is full of plastic, a grim marker of the Anthropocene. There are floating, continent-size patches of it in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and there are newly formed ones in the Arctic. IFLscience New Scientist There are some uninhabited islands that are drowning in the stuff. Weirdly, though, scientists have come to the conclusion that, based on the amount of plastic we make every year, there is only about one… Bacteria Are Evolving… Read More »

Drug Is First to Treat Cancer Based on Genetics, Not Location

Keytruda 1a

Rewriting Life A change in how cancer is treated means more people will benefit from… Emily Mullin MIT Technology Review In a first for precision medicine, a cancer drug has won regulatory approval based on the genetic characteristic of tumors, rather than their… On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had approved Keytruda, an immunotherapy, for patients who have genetic glitches in so-called “mismatch… Drug Is First… Read More »

Hiding in plain sight: how the ‘alt-right’ is weaponizing irony to spread fascism

Brok 5e

Experts say the ‘alt-right’ have stormed mainstream consciousness by using ‘humor’ and ambiguity as tactics to wrong-foot their… Jason Wilson The Guardian Earlier this month, hundreds of “alt-right” protesters occupied the rotunda at Boston Common in the name of free speech. The protest included far-right grouplets old and new – from the Oath Keepers to the… But there were no swastikas or shaved heads in… Hiding in plain… Read More »

Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa, scientists find

Elf 2b

The history of human evolution has been rewritten after scientists discovered that Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa. Sarah Knapton The Telegraph Currently, most experts believe that our human lineage split from apes around seven million years ago in central Africa, where hominids remained for the… But two fossils of an ape-like creature which had human-like teeth have been found in Bulgaria and… Europe was the… Read More »