Wildlife Conservation

Tigers seized from controversial Thai Buddhist temple

Wildlife authorities in Thailand are removing tigers from a controversial Buddhist temple after accusations of wildlife trafficking and animal abuse.. Three of the 137 tigers at the temple in Kanchanaburi province were moved on Monday. The 1,000-personnel operation will last all week. The monks, who deny all allegations, resisted at first but gave in when presented with a court order… Source: Tigers seized from controversial Thai Buddhist temple – BBC News Read More »

Ancient crayfish and worms may die out together

Research suggests that bizarre, tentacled worms which live attached to crayfish in the rivers of Australia are at risk of extinction – because the crayfish themselves are endangered. It would be an example of coextinction, where one organism dies out because it depends on another doomed species. Just a few millimetres long, the worms eat even tinier animals in the water or inside the crayfish gill chamber… Source: Ancient crayfish and worms may die out together – BBC News Read More »

Logging to begin in last remaining European primeval forest

Warsaw: It is the last remaining relic of an ancient forest that stretched for millennia across the lowlands of Europe and Russia, a shadowy, mossy woodland where bison and lynx roam beneath towering oak trees up to 600 years old. Conservationists believe the fate of the Bialowieza Forest, which straddles Poland and Belarus, is more threatened that at any time since the communist era due to a new Polish government plan for extensive logging in parts of the forest. The plan ... Read More »

Finding Dory release could trigger further decline of clownfish populations

The release of Disney’s Finding Nemo more than a decade ago kicked off a continuous decline of wild clownfish populations as people rushed to buy their very own ‘Nemo’. Australian scientists are concerned the upcoming release of Finding Dory could see another spike in the sale of ornamental marine species… Source: Finding Dory release could trigger further decline of clownfish populations Read More »

Talking Point: Ocean acidity rising at the most rapid rate in 300 million years

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IN the week of Scott Morrison’s first budget, 330 scientists in Hobart were focusing on the astonishingly rapid shift in global ocean chemistry. The fourth international conference on “the ocean in a high-CO2 world” looked at how rising carbon dioxide levels are affecting oceans… Source: Talking Point: Ocean acidity rising at the most rapid rate in 300 million years | The Mercury Read More »

Zimbabwe is trying to sell its wildlife because of severe drought

First, it sold its elephants to China. Now, the Zimbabwe government has placed an ad in its state-run newspaper asking members of the public – at least those who have the money and space – to buy some more of the country’s wild animals. The reason is a devastating, relentless El Nino-induced drought that has left as many as 4 million Zimbabweans in need of food aid and ravished the country’s natural resources… Source: Zimbabwe is trying to sell its ... Read More »

Elephant summit: Kenya sets fire to huge ivory stockpile

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta sets fire to a huge stockpile of ivory in an effort to show his country’s commitment to saving Africa’s elephants, but the move has its critics. More than 100 tonnes of ivory was stacked up in pyres in Nairobi National Park where it is expected to burn for several days… Source: Elephant summit: Kenya sets fire to huge ivory stockpile – BBC News Read More »

Hope burns bright for Indian tigers

Tiger, tiger burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? So wrote William Blake, who lived from 1757 to 1827. But Blake could not have… Source: Hope burns bright for Indian tigers – Asia Times Read More »

The war on elephants

How the very existence of Africa’s elephants is threatened by poachers, traffickers and Asia’s appetite for ivory. WARNING: THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES Bloated and eerily upright the large adult elephant was still standing where it had been killed – just next to the stream – its face hacked off… Source: BBC News – The war on elephants Read More »

Melting Arctic ice is forcing polar bears into life-threatening swims

Washington: In September 2009, after a northern summer of warm weather and dwindling ice, a young polar bear slipped into the frigid waters of the Beaufort Sea and began to swim. She didn’t stop for food or rest until nine days later, when she finally encountered a slab of sea ice large enough to sustain her. The journey was some 400 kilometres… Source: Melting Arctic ice is forcing polar bears into life-threatening swims Read More »

A look at India′s recurrent drought problem

Over a quarter of India’s population is affected by the ongoing drought conditions prevailing in large parts of the country. DW examines the reasons behind the problem and the steps needed to alleviate it… Source: A look at India′s recurrent drought problem | Asia | DW.COM | 22.04.2016 Read More »

Bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef should spark greater action on climate change

We should do everything we can to prevent the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef – for its economic value and for its own sake. But morally we cannot expect the rest of the world to reduce carbon emissions drastically to save our reef unless we are leading the effort ourselves… Source: Bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef should spark greater action on climate change Read More »

Queensland researchers bringing the Amazon to the experts to save jungle cats

Sometimes, you just have to move the mountain to Muhammad.. Or, as the case may be, the Amazon to the world. In the race to save jaguars, one of the globe’s most secretive – and threatened – species, researchers and conservationists are hoping to create corridors for the jungle cat to safely travel through, tracks of land across South America, which would remain protected and give the jaguar the best chance of survival… Source: Queensland researchers bringing the Amazon to ... Read More »

Why are Nairobi’s lions suddenly being killed?

The growing populations of humans and lions is creating a deadly situation for the big cats in Kenya.. For the second time in two days, a male lion was killed outside Nairobi National Park. This one, 2-year-old Lemek, was found with a spear through his body. The previous day, a 13-year-old named Mohawk was shot by wildlife rangers who said he posed a threat to human life. They did not have tranquilizers… Source: Why are Nairobi’s lions suddenly being killed? – ... Read More »

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching more widespread than first thought, surveys reveal

New aerial surveys have found the devastating coral bleaching event hitting the Great Barrier Reef has a larger footprint than initially thought. Professor Terry Hughes, who is part of a national coral bleaching taskforce, said research flights on Wednesday between Townsville and Cairns had observed differing levels of bleaching across all 74 reefs that had been surveyed in the… Source: Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching more widespread than first thought, surveys reveal Read More »