Media

Regulating Speech in the New Public Square

Despite the ominous headlines, the influence of fake news on political decision-making appears to be limited. Madeleine de Cock Buning and Miguel Poiares Maduro Project Syndicate But that does not make digital deception any less dangerous; fake news feeds – and is fed by – polarization, and, paradoxically, the more it is discussed, the more disruptive it becomes. FLORENCE – Today, debates about public issues play out on social media, people receive their news via digital platforms, and politicians pitch their ... Read More »

When should judges and courts be subject to scrutiny and criticism?

Speaking earlier this week, Supreme Court of NSW Chief Justice Tom Bathurst said it is entirely appropriate for the judiciary to be criticised for its performance by the media and, by extension, the… Jerome Doraisamy The Lawyers Weekly Addressing the Opening of Law Term Dinner in NSW, Chief Justice Bathurst said that to facilitate appropriate scrutiny and ensure that any criticism is informed, courts must operate as transparently as… “In that way, they become accountable to the other arms of ... Read More »

Does Journalism Have a Future?

In an era of social media and fake news, journalists who have survived the print plunge have new foes to face. Jill Lepore The New Yorker – Audio: Listen to this article. To hear more, download the Audm iPhone app. The wood-panelled tailgate of the 1972 Oldsmobile station wagon dangled open like a broken jaw, making a wobbly bench on which four kids could sit, eight legs swinging. Every Sunday morning, long before dawn, we’d get yanked out of bed ... Read More »

Re-conquest of Constantinople

Vehbi Kara is just another Islamist columnist who would not surprise you. He writes for this columnist’s favourite Islamist daily, Yeni Şafak. Burak Bekdil Sigma Insight Turkey His column on January 11th did not offer readers a revolutionary view –nor was it expected to– but was useful in trying to decipher the “conquest fetish” among conservative Muslims. Mr Kara wrote: “Devout people (Muslims) view Hagia Sophia as a symbol of Islam’s domination in these lands … It (as it is ... Read More »

The art of distraction: Sebastian Smee’s Quarterly Essay

Guilty as charged. Yes, I spend too much time on social media. Yes, I have become more easily distracted. Yes, I have given up too much personal information to various apps and websites over the years. And yes, I have read a number of articles that articulate precisely how foolish, or at least, misguided this… Stephanie Trigg The Conversation And so when I opened up Sebastian Smee’s Quarterly Essay, Net Loss: The Inner Life in the Digital Age, I was ... Read More »

Older, conservatives are the most likely to share fake news, study finds

People aged over 65 were more likely to share fake news on Facebook than younger people according to a new study. AFP – SBS Facebook users aged 65 plus and conservatives are more likely to share fake news on the platform than younger or more liberal counterparts, according to a new study published Wednesday. During the 2016 US presidential campaign, researchers from Princeton University and New York University surveyed over 2,711 Facebook users, of whom 49 percent agreed to share ... Read More »

Journalist Pelin Ünker sentenced to jail in Turkey over Paradise Papers investigation

Journalist was found guilty of ‘defamation and insult’ for writing about companies owned by former PM Julian Borger The Guardian A Turkish journalist has been sentenced to more than a year in jail for her work on the Paradise Papers investigation into offshore tax havens, because it revealed details of the business activities of the country’s former prime minister and his sons. Pelin Ünker, a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) was found guilty in an Istanbul ... Read More »

Citizen Murdoch’s critical grip on democracy

This year will be an important year for three of the world’s oldest, continuing democracies – the United States, the UK and Australia. Kevin Rudd Brisbane Times The US will decide, post-Mueller, whether Trump’s presidency is terminal. The UK will decide whether to tear up a half a century of European integration. And Australia faces a general election. It will also be an important year for the Murdoch media where its power in these three democracies is formidable, and in ... Read More »

There’s no excuse for justifying the racist attitudes that plague Australia

We must name white supremacist beliefs, whether they come from the fringes or the Senate Luke Pearson The Guardian 2018 had a lot of moments of hope despite the rising tones of white supremacy in Australia and abroad. The Liberal party voted in favour of Pauline Hanson’s “It’s OK to be white” motion (and no, it wasn’t an “administrative error”), but quickly backtracked when media started to point out the… Just that in itself was significant in many ways. Australia doesn’t ... Read More »

Khashoggi, other journalists honored at Times Square

Injecting a somber note into the festivities, the NewYork City’s Times Square Alliance, the business association that organizes the famous New Year’s Eve party, paid a special tribute to freedom of the press, after a… New York Hurriyet Karen Attiah, who edited the Washington Post columns of Jamal Khashoggi, the Saudi journalist who was killed inside a Saudi Arabian consulate in Turkey, was among the invitees. Mr. Holt of NBC, Alisyn Camerota of CNN, Vladimir Duthiers of CBS, Jon Scott of Fox News, editors from The Wall Street ... Read More »

The other Khashoggi

A gruesome death in Ukraine provides a warning for those following the murder of the Saudi journalist. Mary Mycio Politico An opposition journalist disappears. Anonymous tapes hint at his gruesome murder. An autocrat selling himself as a pro-Western reformer, beset by intrigue at home, is blamed for the death. In moral repugnance, the democratic world shuns him, sparking a foreign policy crisis. If this sounds like the case of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, that’s because it is. But the scenario ... Read More »

How ‘access journalism’ is threatening investigative journalism

A series of memoirs are appearing for Christmas – by Mike Carlton, Kerry O’Brien and the like – as the baby boomer generation of journalists gets some quality time to reflect, laugh, and reveal some new… Peter Manning The Conversation As the receiver of a cheapo massive cardboard screed in 1972 for “investigative journalism” from my colleagues in the ABC’s This Day Tonight, my recollection was that “investigative journalism” was a cool, new… I accepted the award with honour. It ... Read More »

Five things we learned from Australian media in 2018

From explosive, leaked emails, to the fall of the digital giants, there are plenty of lessons to be learned from the stories that dominated the media industry in 2018. John McDuling Brisbane Times Here are five of the best of them: Lesson one: emails are the gift that keeps on giving Former Cricket Australia chairman, David Peever’s, leaked email to CBS executive, Armando Nuñez, admonishing Network Ten (which CBS owns) for its “appalling tactics” and for being “bottom feeders in this market” ... Read More »

North Cyprus journalist takes on Turkey’s mighty Erdogan

“There is always a price you pay for freedom of expression” AFP Arab News NICOSIA: Jail time, angry mobs and assassination attempts — editor Sener Levent has paid a price for challenging Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and authorities in breakaway northern Cyprus through his tiny newspaper. Alongside the stacks of old papers on his desk in northern Nicosia, a luminous screen displays footage from security cameras at his office’s entrances. The cameras are part of protective measures in place ... Read More »

Suppression orders in Australia: why you can’t read what you may want to

After Victoria’s premier Daniel Andrews said he would overhaul the state’s use of orders, here is a guide to the legal bans Naaman Zhou The Guardian What is a suppression order? A suppression order is made when a court prohibits the disclosure of information about a legal case. These are ordered in Australia for a variety of reasons – in the interest of national security, to protect the safety of witnesses, or to guarantee a fair trial. They can be ... Read More »

Four journalists, one newspaper: Time Magazine’s Person of the Year recognises the global assault on journalism

Time Magazine has just announced its “Person of the Year” for 2018, and for once, it isn’t one person. This time it is four people and a newspaper. Prof. Peter Greste The C0nversation Collectively calling them “The Guardians”, Time has awarded the accolade to the murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Filipino journalist Maria Ressa who edits the Rappler news website, two… Time’s Person of the Year cover is reserved for those who the magazine judges have had “the greatest impact ... Read More »