Arts & Culture

Why Trump’s First Trip Is Focusing on Faith

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Trump’s administration recognizes that ideas and identity still have power, and need to be understood. Alberto M. Fernandez The National Interest Despised by so many among the American political and cultural elite, President Trump paradoxically still has a tremendous opportunity during his first overseas trip to begin to forge a… Given that most media coverage of President Trump is negative, it is no… Why Trump’s First… Read More »

A poem about refugees you need to read

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Following the November 2015 Paris attacks, a wave of anti-refugee sentiment made its way overseas to the United States as multiple governors and Congressmen began expressing an… The Refugees, authored by Jason Fotso. To Jason Fotso―eighteen years old at the time―this shut-door stance contradicted the longstanding U.S. policy of welcoming in refugees, and more symbolically, the sonnet inscribed on the… He sought to capture this spirit in a… A poem about… Read More »

Adam Goodes once again face of anti-racism fight in multicolour Archibald Prize portrait entry

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After enduring years of racist abuse which dogged the end of his illustrious AFL career, Adam Goodes is once again challenging racism, this time as the subject of a multicolour artwork painted for… Nadia Daly ABC Colour Doesn’t Matter was painted by Darwin artist Megan Adams as a response to the racial abuse of her friend’s Indigenous son, a Year 6… “He’s just the kindest, happy-go-lucky kid so it was really hard to see him so… Adam Goodes once… Read More »

The Man Trap

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Traditional ideas of masculinity persist in the workplace, even though men are now expected to do more of the household chores – and work longer hours. Emily Bobrow investigates the trials of modern manhood The Economist Nathan, a successful lawyer in Manhattan, hardly seems like a candidate for sympathy. His midtown office is smart, his suit is… The Man… Read More »

The future of arts journalism is up to readers

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We’ve said it before and sadly, we’re saying it again. As tax-payer funded arts companies and organisations devote increasing marketing resources to advertising on Google, Facebook and their own websites, arts journalism is in… By Raymond Gill  Daily Review faces the same challenges as Fairfax Media and many other smaller publications trying to survive at a time when independent arts commentary and critique is… When we launched in 2013, we… The future of arts… Read More »

Hokusai: the Great Wave that swept the world

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He called himself Old Man Crazy To Paint and made his best work in his 70s. As his dragons, deities, poets and wrestlers go on show, we look at the obsessions of the poster-boy for Japanese art John-Paul Stonard The Guardian Had Katsushika Hokusai died when he was struck by lightning at the age of 50 in 1810, he would be remembered as a popular artist of the ukiyo-e, or “floating world” school of Japanese art, but hardly the great ... Read More »

A passport from a country that doesn’t exist

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The NSK has invented a nation as a work of art – and its pavilion at the Venice Biennale has much to say about statehood and globalisation, writes Benjamin Ramm. Benjamin Ramm BBC The woman who stamps my passport is called Mercy and she has no fixed abode. Born in Nigeria, she travelled via Libya to Italy, where she lives in the city of Padua in a… A passport from… Read More »

Palais Theatre in St Kilda reopens its famous doors after $26 million revamp

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Thirty years ago Martin Foley took a woman he’d just met on a first date to the ballet at St Kilda’s Palais Theatre. Elias Clure ABC Today Mr Foley, as the Minister for Creative Industries, unveiled a $26 million redevelopment that saved the iconic theatre from almost certainly closing. As well as hosting ballet, the 90-year-old venue has welcomed some of Melbourne’s best ever known gigs. The Rolling Stones supported Roy Orbison at the… Palais Theatre in… Read More »

Video: 150 years of Canadian foreign policy

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On July 1, Canada celebrates 150 years of nationhood — marking the uniting of three British colonies (Canada, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). How has Canada’s foreign policy changed over… OpenCanada With the anniversary in mind, this OpenCanada video, written by journalist Michael Petrou and animated by Emmy Award-winning art director Santosh Isaac, explores the challenges and… From Canada’s outsized contributions during… Video: 150 years… Read More »

There’s no such thing as a ‘pure’ European—or anyone else

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When the first busloads of migrants from Syria and Iraq rolled into Germany 2 years ago, some small towns were overwhelmed. Ann Gibbons Science The village of Sumte, population 102, had to take in 750 asylum seekers. Most villagers swung into action, in keeping with Germany’s strong Willkommenskultur, or “welcome culture.” But one self… There’s no such… Read More »

I acted as a man to get work – until I was accused of rape

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Pili Hussein wanted to make her fortune prospecting for a precious stone that’s said to be a thousand times rarer than diamonds, but since women weren’t allowed down the mines she dressed up as man and fooled her male colleagues for almost a decade. Sarah McDermott BBC Pili Hussein grew up in a large family in Tanzania. The daughter of a… I acted as… Read More »

Fireworks, feelings, and fraught relations at Eurovision 2017

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For one week in May, the bleary-eyed in our workplaces are not the sports fans following northern hemisphere leagues, nor are they the new parents. Jess Carniel  The Conversation They are Eurovision fans. And we are legion. The Eurovision Song Contest offers its fans glitz (or at least glitter), glamour, politics, intrigue, increasingly limited lessons in how to count in French and, of course… Fireworks, feelings, and… Read More »

Rokaya Diallo: ‘France sees itself as a white country’

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Author, film director and activist Rokhaya Diallo addresses the challenge of racism following the presidential election. Anealla Safdar Al Jazeera Paris, France – In March, police killed Shaoyo Liu, a 56-year-old Chinese immigrant, at his home in the 19th arrondissement in Paris during a raid. The officer who fired the fatal shot said he was acting in self-defence, claiming that the father-of-five wounded a policeman with a… Rokaya Diallo: ‘France… Read More »

A Zen master explains why “positive thinking” is terrible advice

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Have you ever been told to just “think positive” and your problems will go away? Or that to achieve your goals in life, all you have to do is visualize it with positive intent? The Power of Ideas Inspirational Ideapod blog It’s a philosophy that’s been popular for decades thanks to books like How to win Friends and Influence People and Think and Grow Rich.  But is it really helping us live more meaningful and fulfilling lives? Not exactly… A ... Read More »

Cary Grant: how 100 acid trips in Tinseltown ‘changed my life’

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At the height of his fame, Cary Grant turned to LSD therapy for help. He later claimed the drug saved him, but did it also spell the end of his career? Xan Brooks The Guardian In the late 1950s, at the height of his fame, Cary Grant set off on a trip in search of his true self, unpicking the myth he had spent three decades perfecting. He tried hypnosis and yoga and felt that they both came up short. ... Read More »

It’s a fallacy that all Australians have access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene

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Nations are gathering in New York this week to discuss the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which aim to improve health, wealth and well-being for countries both rich and poor. Nina Lansbury Hall Cindy Shannon Paul Jagals The Conversation As a developed nation, it might be assumed that Australia will easily meet these new goals at home – including goal number 6, to… But the unpalatable truth is… It’s a fallacy… Read More »