Arts & Culture

Universities need to do more to support refugee students

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In the past two decades Australian universities and schools have received growing numbers of students from refugee backgrounds. This is in line with increasing numbers of people accepted through… Authors: The Conversation But there are concerns refugee students are denied access to equitable educational opportunities as a result of: the challenges of settlement competing demands on their time due to family responsibilities (both in Australia and back home) financial concerns and getting trapped in low-skilled jobs. In addition, transition is ... Read More »

How Shakespeare used music to tell stories

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Today we fully expect film, television and theatre to use music to shape meaning. Simon Smith The Conversation The screeching violins of Psycho and the menacing Jaws theme, for instance, both depend upon a shared 20th-century dramatic language in which music indicates mood. Rewind 400 years and it may not seem like the same is true. Take Shakespearean drama. Many modern productions choose to avoid historical music altogether, preferring new compositions or pre-recorded popular songs that more obviously indicate mood ... Read More »

Infant mortality rates higher in areas with more Christian fundamentalists, study finds

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The odds of an infant dying before their first birthday are higher in counties with greater proportions of conservative Protestants, especially fundamentalists, than in counties with more mainline Protestants and… Portland State University EurekAlert! The study, published online in May in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, supports the idea that the more insular, anti-institutional culture of fundamentalists can lead to poorer health outcomes. Ginny Garcia-Alexander, a sociology professor in PSU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and ... Read More »

Martin Luther King’s son says Australia should be ’embarrassed’ by Indigenous treatment

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The son of legendary civil rights leader Martin Luther King Junior has said Australia should be embarrassed of the way it treats Indigenous Australians. Steven Schubert ABC Speaking on a visit to Alice Springs, Martin Luther King III said Australia’s Indigenous people were worse off than when he first visited the country two decades ago. “For some reason, there’s been this desire to re-oppress people who are already oppressed,” he said. “Here I am 20 years later, and I don’t ... Read More »

Macron Defends Magazine That Labeled Erdogan a ‘Dictator’

James Boxell, editor for Bloomberg Gadfly, poses for a photograph in London, U.K. on Tuesday, April 24, 2018.

Bloomberg, London, U.K. Tuesday, April 24, 2018. Photographer: Simon Dawson 

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French President Emmanuel Macron waded into a debate over a magazine cover that labeled Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as a “dictator,” saying attacks on kiosks selling the latest issue were unacceptable. Helene Fouquet Bloomberg “Freedom of the press has no price: without it, it’s dictatorship,” Macron said on Twitter late on Monday. “It is totally unacceptable that Le Point posters are being ripped off kiosks on the grounds they displease the enemies of freedom of the press, in France ... Read More »

How One Hundred Years of Solitude Redefined Latin America

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When Gabriel García Márquez wrote One Hundred Years of Solitude, he reimagined the genesis of his continent. That had real political impact, writes Felipe Restrepo Pombo. BBC Before One Hundred Years of Solitude, Latin America bore certain similarities to the imaginary place described in the first paragraph of the novel: “The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point”. The continent, obviously, wasn’t a new place when Gabriel ... Read More »

BBC historian suggests the British Museum should have a ‘Supermarket Sweep’ where every country has two minutes to take back their artifacts

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The British Museum should have a ‘Supermarket Sweep’ where countries have two minutes to take back their artifacts, a BBC historian has suggested. By Jim Norton for the Daily Mail David Olusoga said there was a ‘moral imperative’ for relics to be returned and that it could help our relationship with the Commonwealth after Brexit. Born in Nigeria, he said he felt strongly that the Benin Bronzes should be given back to the country of his heritage after they were ... Read More »

Duterte: Don’t refer to my kin as ‘First Family’

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MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte wants to do away with another Malacañang tradition as he asked the public not to use “First Family” when referring to his family, saying the practice is passé and is not appropriate in a democracy. phil.star Duterte expressed his dislike for the term while he was warning officials not to talk to any of his relatives about government projects. “I told them not to talk (to my family). I really do not want it. ... Read More »

Film Review: Together Apart (2018) by Maren Wickwire

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“Now the time has come to leave you” Ever since we have entered what might just be one of the final stages of globalization, with the rise of digitization, especially through social media and the omnipresence of online technology, people, companies, politicians and… Rouven Linnarz AMP Interconnectedness goes hand in hand with a new concept of work and of the worker as well, all of which boils down to the increasing importance of transnationalism, according to Management Practice Professor Lynda ... Read More »

Exploring The Landscape Of Bilingual Journalism

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As the anchor and managing editor of the NPR program Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa is considered to be someone at the forefront of reporting by and for people of color, with the show regularly including reporting in Spanish. Natalie Van Hoozer KUNR Our bilingual reporter Natalie Van Hoozer interviewed Hinojosa in Spanish about the state of bilingual reporting in the U.S. and its challenges, then sat down with our News Director Michelle Billman to recap their conversation. Michelle Billman: Natalie, ... Read More »

Philip Roth, Towering Novelist Who Explored Lust, Jewish Life and America, Dies at 85

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Philip Roth, the prolific, protean, and often blackly comic novelist who was a pre-eminent figure in 20th-century literature, died on Tuesday night at a hospital in Manhattan. He was 85. Charles McGrath The New York Times The cause was congestive heart failure, said the writer Judith Thurman, a close friend. Mr. Roth had homes in Manhattan and Connecticut. In the course of a very long career, Mr. Roth took on many guises — mainly versions of himself — in the ... Read More »

The Conversation Hour: Robyn Nevin, Anna O’Byrne, and Damian Smith, with Christos Tsiolkas

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John Faine’s co-host is novelist, playwright, and essayist Christos Tsiolkas (Loaded, The Jesus Man, Dead Europe, The Slap, Barracuda). ABC His latest book is On Patrick White (Black Inc. in conjunction with the University of Melbourne and State Library Victoria). Their first guests are actors Robyn Nevin AM and soprano Anna O’Byrne, who both star in the forthcoming staging of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! celebrating 75 years since it was first on Broadway, and 20 years of The… The show stars Simon Gleeson, Anna O’Byrne, ... Read More »

Jewish Americans changed their names, but not at Ellis Island

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A well-worn joke in American Jewish culture goes like this. A Jewish immigrant landed at Ellis Island in New York. Kirsten Fermaglich The Conversation The procedures were confusing, and he was overwhelmed by the commotion. When one of the officials asked him “What is your name?” he replied, “Shayn fergessen,” which in Yiddish means “I’ve already forgotten.” The official then recorded his name as Sean Ferguson. Today, members of many white ethnic groups – including Jews, Italians and Poles – ... Read More »

Australia’s taste for translated literature is getting broader, and that’s a good thing

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With today’s announcement of the winner of the Man Booker International Prize shortlist, translation again finds itself in the foreground of the literary landscape. Alice Whitmore The Conversation This year’s shortlist includes novels translated from a diverse array of languages including Arabic (Frankenstein in Baghdad by Ahmed Saadawi), Hungarian (László Krasznahorkai’s The World Goes On) and Korean (The White Book by Han Kang). In 2016, the prize evolved from a biennial event, designed to honour one living author’s overall contribution ... Read More »

Reporting my sexual assault was horrific but healing. Here’s what I learned

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Few women who survive a sexual attack make a formal complaint. For Eggshell Skull author Bri Lee, it’s about justice The Guardian Ιt will take a long time and there’s no rushing it. For me (and for others I’ve spoken to), the decision to finally make an official police complaint about a sex offence wasn’t so much a “lightbulb moment” as the gradual knocking away at a tall wall with a small mallet, brick by brick. Not just any old ... Read More »

I teach refugees to map their world

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I first visited the Zaatari refugee camp in early 2015. Located in northern Jordan, the camp is home to more than 80,000 Syrian refugees. Brian Tomaszewski The Conversation I was there as part of a research study on refugee camp wireless and information infrastructure. It’s one thing to read about refugees in the news. It’s a whole different thing to actually go visit a camp. I saw people living in metal caravans, mixed with tents and other materials to create ... Read More »