Arts & Culture

Muhammad Ali funeral attracts stars and thousands of fans

Before the big names took centre stage, there was time for the little people of Louisville, Kentucky to farewell Mohammad Ali – great as a boxer, but a great Muslim and a great, if controversial American too… Hanging in the airwaves, in serial interviews, was the voice of Ali’s ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ opponent George Foreman, who pushed back on attempts to pigeonhole Ali as a boxer, a black or a Muslim – Ali simply was the greatest… Source: Muhammad Ali funeral ... Read More »

Why human rights and Christian faith aren’t always compatible

Is the Christian faith compatibale with modern human rights? A recent conflict between Amnesty International and the Roman Catholic Church in Northern Ireland has sparked questions as to whether the modern manifestation of human rights and the Christian faith can ever see eye-to-eye. Catholics in Northern Ireland don’t want this human rights charity speaking in their schools because their views on abortion are in conflict with the Church’s pro-life position. Their protest is not a dispute of the good that ... Read More »

Hatful of Hollow: Christian Philosophy’s Dogmatic Slumber

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In the mid-1980s The Smiths released their first compilation album, Hatful of Hollow. Although it was not a traditional studio work but a compilation of BBC radio sessions, non-album singles and B-sides, the album is highly regarded by fans and critics alike – indeed, I rate it as their finest. I bring it up here as a necessary antidote to some of the remarks, as well as the general tenor, of the article written by Father Isidoros Katsos in response ... Read More »

Turkey’s Erdoğan cuts US trip short without attending Muhammad Ali burial

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan cut short a trip on June 9 to the United States, where he had gone to attend the funeral ceremony of boxing legend Muhammad Ali. According to information from presidential sources, however, Erdoğan and other government representatives, decided to depart for Turkey without participating in the full funeral ceremony for the late boxer in Louisville, Kentucky… Source: Turkey’s Erdoğan cuts US trip short without attending Muhammad Ali burial – POLITICS Read More »

The Chilling Effect of Fear at America’s Colleges

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The coddling of students’ minds has resulted in grave restrictions of free speech on campus—but academic leaders are also to blame. Jonathan R. Cole The Atlantic No great universities exist in the world without a deep institutional commitment to academic freedom, free inquiry, and free expression. For the past 60 years, American research universities have been vigilant against external and internal attempts to limit or… The Chilling Effect… Read More »

Memo to the Coalition: don’t come to an arts policy debate without an arts policy

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Cultural policy is an election issue for the first time in 20 years. To understand why, look no further than arts minister Mitch Fifield’s performance at an industry debate.. You have to feel for the arts minister, Mitch Fifield. It’s never easy turning up to a political debate where most of the audience is against you. That’s what Fifield had to endure at Wednesday’s national arts election debate, held at Melbourne’s Wheeler Centre. As they say in show business, it ... Read More »

Should Lawyers Be Ethically Obligated to Protect the Environment?

Contrary to many corny jokes, lawyers do follow a code of ethics. But there’s a glaring omission in the professions’ ethical outline: the environment. The American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct is a suggested blueprint for state bars, laying out a boilerplate for client-lawyer relationships, public service, communication and other matters of the professions. “It talks about other legal obligations for third parties, but never talks about the environment,” said Tom Lininger, a professor at the University of ... Read More »

Ancient Greeks would not recognise our ‘democracy’ – they’d see an ‘oligarchy’

We owe to the ancient Greeks much, if not most of our own current political vocabulary. All the way from anarchy and democracy to politics itself. But their politics and ours are very different beasts. To an ancient Greek democrat (of any stripe), all our modern democratic systems would count as “oligarchy”. By that I mean the rule of and by – if not necessarily or expressly for – the few, as opposed to the power or control of the ... Read More »

How False Equivalence Is Distorting the 2016 Election Coverage

On March 15, Donald Trump won Florida, North Carolina, Missouri, and Illinois, dispatching Marco Rubio’s campaign to the ash heap of history and giving every impression that he had become the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee.. The media’s need to cover “both sides” of every story makes no sense when one side has little regard for the truth… Source: How False Equivalence Is Distorting the 2016 Election Coverage | The Nation Read More »

Why do the British love the taste of tea so much?

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The British drink more than 60 billion cups of tea a year – so what is it about this humble brew that refreshes them so? Whether they take their tea with milk, sugar, lemon or just plain, it’s clear that the British have a fondness for its flavour. There’s something about that firm bitterness that sparks devotion: the British consume 60 billion cups per year, according to the Tea and Infusions Organisation. That’s more than 900 cups a… Source: BBC ... Read More »

Aboriginal sacred site up to 8,000 years old destroyed by ‘cultural vandals’

Scratching out of ochre stencils on Derwent valley cave wall is ‘devastating’, says Clyde Mansell, chairman of Tasmanian Aboriginal Land Council.. Vandals have destroyed a sacred Aboriginal site in Tasmania by scratching out hand stencils which traditional owners say were made during large clan gatherings up to 8,000 years ago… Source: Aboriginal sacred site up to 8,000 years old destroyed by ‘cultural vandals’ | Australia news | The Guardian Read More »

Brazil Helps Syrian Refugees Bridge Language Gap

“In just over two months I was speaking Portuguese. I don’t know how I learned it.”.. “Ratatat! Pow!” For a few years, these were the only sounds that 12-year-old Hanan Daqqah heard in Idlib, in northeastern Syria. She spent days locked up inside, unable to attend school or meet up with friends. Her childhood was passing her by. In 2015, Daqqah and her family left Jordan’s Za’atari refugee camp, where they had… Source: Brazil Helps Syrian Refugees Bridge Language Gap Read More »

Tutankhamun’s dagger ‘made with iron from meteorite’

Researchers say analysis of metal content ‘strongly suggests extraterrestrial origin’.. A dagger entombed with King Tutankhamun was made with iron from a meteorite, a new analysis on the metal composition shows. In 1925, archaeologist Howard Carter found two daggers, one iron and one with a blade of gold, within the wrapping of the teenage king, who was… Source: Tutankhamun’s dagger ‘made with iron from meteorite’ Read More »

Does religion restrict freedom?

The word ‘freedom’ is one of the great buzzwords of our culture. In the words of the rock band Queen, we all want to “break free”. Whether it’s Mel Gibson shouting “Freedom” as he is hung, drawn and quartered, or Martin Luther King crying “Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty we are free at last”, we all want freedom. But as Rousseau famously observed: “Man is born free but everywhere he is in chains”. What chains… Source: Does ... Read More »

Tigers seized from controversial Thai Buddhist temple

Wildlife authorities in Thailand are removing tigers from a controversial Buddhist temple after accusations of wildlife trafficking and animal abuse.. Three of the 137 tigers at the temple in Kanchanaburi province were moved on Monday. The 1,000-personnel operation will last all week. The monks, who deny all allegations, resisted at first but gave in when presented with a court order… Source: Tigers seized from controversial Thai Buddhist temple – BBC News Read More »

Rahmani, Neda

Neda Rahmani

A child of the revolution, born in Iran to Persian and Mauritian Parents. Neda grew up in Australia enjoying the freedom to perform and develop as one of Australia’s strong live female performers. A seasoned percussionist and natural performer, she is also now establishing herself as an actress and story teller. Her main band is called Neda – All Colour Project. She is Melbourne Festival’s and Multicultural Arts Victroria’s Cultural ambassador and her career has been in collaborating and delivering ... Read More »