Arts & Culture

Exploring The Landscape Of Bilingual Journalism

As the anchor and managing editor of the NPR program Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa is considered to be someone at the forefront of reporting by and for people of color, with the show regularly including reporting in Spanish. Natalie Van Hoozer KUNR Our bilingual reporter Natalie Van Hoozer interviewed Hinojosa in Spanish about the state of bilingual reporting in the U.S. and its challenges, then sat down with our News Director Michelle Billman to recap their conversation. Michelle Billman: Natalie, ... Read More »

Philip Roth, Towering Novelist Who Explored Lust, Jewish Life and America, Dies at 85

Philip Roth, the prolific, protean, and often blackly comic novelist who was a pre-eminent figure in 20th-century literature, died on Tuesday night at a hospital in Manhattan. He was 85. Charles McGrath The New York Times The cause was congestive heart failure, said the writer Judith Thurman, a close friend. Mr. Roth had homes in Manhattan and Connecticut. In the course of a very long career, Mr. Roth took on many guises — mainly versions of himself — in the ... Read More »

The Conversation Hour: Robyn Nevin, Anna O’Byrne, and Damian Smith, with Christos Tsiolkas

John Faine’s co-host is novelist, playwright, and essayist Christos Tsiolkas (Loaded, The Jesus Man, Dead Europe, The Slap, Barracuda). ABC His latest book is On Patrick White (Black Inc. in conjunction with the University of Melbourne and State Library Victoria). Their first guests are actors Robyn Nevin AM and soprano Anna O’Byrne, who both star in the forthcoming staging of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! celebrating 75 years since it was first on Broadway, and 20 years of The… The show stars Simon Gleeson, Anna O’Byrne, ... Read More »

Jewish Americans changed their names, but not at Ellis Island

A well-worn joke in American Jewish culture goes like this. A Jewish immigrant landed at Ellis Island in New York. Kirsten Fermaglich The Conversation The procedures were confusing, and he was overwhelmed by the commotion. When one of the officials asked him “What is your name?” he replied, “Shayn fergessen,” which in Yiddish means “I’ve already forgotten.” The official then recorded his name as Sean Ferguson. Today, members of many white ethnic groups – including Jews, Italians and Poles – ... Read More »

Australia’s taste for translated literature is getting broader, and that’s a good thing

With today’s announcement of the winner of the Man Booker International Prize shortlist, translation again finds itself in the foreground of the literary landscape. Alice Whitmore The Conversation This year’s shortlist includes novels translated from a diverse array of languages including Arabic (Frankenstein in Baghdad by Ahmed Saadawi), Hungarian (László Krasznahorkai’s The World Goes On) and Korean (The White Book by Han Kang). In 2016, the prize evolved from a biennial event, designed to honour one living author’s overall contribution ... Read More »

Reporting my sexual assault was horrific but healing. Here’s what I learned

Few women who survive a sexual attack make a formal complaint. For Eggshell Skull author Bri Lee, it’s about justice The Guardian Ιt will take a long time and there’s no rushing it. For me (and for others I’ve spoken to), the decision to finally make an official police complaint about a sex offence wasn’t so much a “lightbulb moment” as the gradual knocking away at a tall wall with a small mallet, brick by brick. Not just any old ... Read More »

I teach refugees to map their world

I first visited the Zaatari refugee camp in early 2015. Located in northern Jordan, the camp is home to more than 80,000 Syrian refugees. Brian Tomaszewski The Conversation I was there as part of a research study on refugee camp wireless and information infrastructure. It’s one thing to read about refugees in the news. It’s a whole different thing to actually go visit a camp. I saw people living in metal caravans, mixed with tents and other materials to create ... Read More »

Richard Glover: In need of some moral support

I’ve just signed a contract for a new book and – for the first time – there’s a clause demanding that I be morally upstanding. Richard Glover The Canberra Times It notes that the “commercial value of the work” is intrinsically linked to the “standing in the community of the author” and, therefore, if I misbehave they have a right to seize back the modest advance and – presumably – burn all copies of the… This puts a lot of ... Read More »

‘Measuring success differently’: New Zealand budget’s shift in economic thinking

The Ardern government in New Zealand is articulating a bigger role for government in society, talking up wellbeing over traditional economic measures — while still playing on the standard “fiscal… David Donaldson TheMandarin New Zealand’s Labour-led coalition government has handed down its first budget, highlighting health, education and housing as areas of focus. “Our priorities are different from the previous government. We are determined to turn the page on the ideology of individualism and a hands-off approach to our economy ... Read More »

Tom Wolfe elevated journalism into enduring literature

In 20th-century popular culture, journalists were portrayed as needy hacks desperate to write the Great American Novel. William McKeen The Conversation Journalism was the means to an end that few achieved. But Tom Wolfe, who died May 14 at age 88, helped change that in the 1960s. He was one of the New Journalists, who wrote nonfiction using the techniques of fiction. As an example: Journalists had long been trained to use direct quotations sparingly and to look for money ... Read More »

One day, two students: What college looks like from opposite ends of the income gap

A college degree has long been touted as society’s great leveler, essential for entry into the middle class. Rachel Kurzius andHarrison Smith The Washington Post Nearly 20 million students enrolled in an undergraduate program in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Movies and television tend to portray an idealized college experience, featuring 18- to 21-year-olds who attend four-year institutions and live on campus. But in reality the college experience is far more varied. Only 15 percent of the undergraduate ... Read More »

Jillian Murray and Suzanne Chaundy’s De Stroyed

Listen now(Link will open in new window) Download audio ABC – Monday 14 May 2018 10:15AM (view full episode) IMAGE: JILLIAN MURRAY IN DE STROYED. (SUPPLIED: FORTYFIVEDOWNSTAIRS/JODIE HUTCHINSON) Award-winning actor and theatre maker Jillian Murray returns to the stage in De Stroyed— a collaboration with director Suzanne Chaundy coming to Melbourne’s fortyfivedownstairs. The one-person play adapts the words of French feminist Simone de Beauvoir, particularly her love letters to Jean-Paul Sartre, to reflect on the origins of contemporary feminism and question how far we have ... Read More »

Seeing the unseen: the exhibition opening up the universe to teenagers

Scienceworks museum takes a new approach to getting young people interested in Stem subjects – with playful results Jane Howard The Guardian Dr Kendall Ackley pushes her fist into the universe: purples and pinks and flashes of yellow, two black holes spin across the screen. As she pushes, the universe responds, concaving inwards. Her fist becomes a “potential well”, its gravity overriding that of the other black holes, pulling them into its orbit. Ackley was a member of the team ... Read More »

German Culture Minister Pushes For $353 Million Increase In Arts Funding

German minister of culture Monika Grütters announced on May 2 that the country plans to increase its arts funding by approximately $353 million, Monopol reports. ArtForum If approved by parliament, the $2 billion budget for culture and media would be increased by 23 percent from the previous year. The proposed budget is representative of Grütters’s pledge to bolster federal support for the arts during the 2017 election year. Grütters also stated that the increased funding is an example of the government’s belief in the ... Read More »

Wlad’s worlds: Polish Resistance fighter, ‘Slavic space age’ modernist, legendary Australian artist

The relationship between art and life is tricky to navigate. But in the case of the Polish-born Australian artist Wladyslaw Dutkiewicz (1918-1999) the two seem inseparable. Christine Judith Nicholls The Conversation This is evident in the outstanding commemorative solo exhibition of his artistic career, Wladyslaw Dutkiewicz: 100th Anniversary Exhibition, expertly curated by his son Adam and currently on show at South Australia’s elegant Murray Bridge Regional Gallery. Born in Stara Sol, near Lwow, Wlad (as he became universally known) studied ... Read More »

Why bullshit hurts democracy more than lies

Since the inauguration of Donald Trump as president, members of his administration have made many statements best described as misleading. Michael Blake The Conversation During the administration’s first week, then-press secretary Sean Spicer claimed that Trump’s inauguration was the most well attended ever. More recently, Scott Pruitt claimed falsely to have received death threats as a result of his tenure at the Environmental Protection Agency. President Trump himself has frequently been accused of telling falsehoods – including, on the campaign ... Read More »