Arts & Culture

Every day is Survival Day in the colony of Australia

January 26 is redneck Christmas and white supremacist festivus rolled into one Scott Trindall for IndigenousX The Guardian When you think about it you realise that Australia’s only really got a couple of holidays that aren’t religion-based or coincide with the local show. And, given that Aussies love taking a day off – we lead the world in chucking sickies – you can start to appreciate why so many white people have such a strong affinity with January 26 and ... Read More »

Fundamental freedoms and the right to participate in public and political life

Almost two quarters of a century have already passed since July 20, 1974 when Turkey invaded Cyprus, occupied 40% of its territory and used all possible means to force the 200 000 Christian inhabitants of the occupied area to flee their ancestral homes and settle in the free southern part of the island as refugees. Mattheos Economides Agora Dialogue More than 7 000 Cypriots of Greek origin were murdered by the invaders and around 2000 were held hostages, the fate ... Read More »

Hidden women of history: the priestess Pythia at the Delphic Oracle, who spoke truth to power

In a time and place that offered few career opportunities for women, the job of the priestess of Apollo at Delphi stands out. Julia Kindt The Conversation Her position was at the centre of one of the most powerful religious institutions of the ancient world. The competing Greek city states had few overarching authorities (political or otherwise), so the significance of her voice should not be underestimated. Indeed, there is some evidence to suggest that the Pythia was at the ... Read More »

My Australia: The woman tackling workplace ignorance about Indigenous Australians

Djiribul woman Shelley Reys has spent her career trying to bridge the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Today she counts Microsoft, Qantas and Telstra as clients. Matt Connellan SBS My Australia is a special series exploring cultural heritage and identity, and asking what it means to be Australian in 2019. When Shelley Reys was a little girl, she watched her father win ‘the race that stops a nation’. Frank Reys became the only Aboriginal jockey to win the Melbourne ... Read More »

‘Children are the real victims of conflict’

The global refugee crisis through the lens of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Muhammed Muheisen Words: Argyro Vourdoumpa, SBS Greek | Production: John Dexter  Jordanian photojournalist Muhammed Muheisen aims to bring to life the stories of refugees, migrants and internally displaced people, as well as the challenges they face settling in new countries. The two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, has been documenting refugee crises across the Middle East, Asia and Europe for over a decade. “Not everyone is aware of what is happening in our world,” Muheisen ... Read More »

Love thy neighbour? Just 4 per cent of Canberrans socialise in their street

When was the last time you caught up with your neighbours? Or borrowed a cup of sugar? Could you even recognise them out in public? Serena Coady The Canberra Times New research suggests most Canberrans wouldn’t, with just four per cent of ACT residents currently socialising with their neighbours. The study – undertaken by Mastercard and the Happiness Institute – found that 55 per cent of Canberrans didn’t know their neighbour’s name, and 25 per cent didn’t know what they looked ... Read More »

In pictures: ‘Super blood wolf moon’

Stargazers have been scanning the skies for sightings of a highly unusual lunar eclipse, which began on Sunday night. BBC During the spectacle, known as a “super blood wolf moon”, the moon appears to glow red while seeming brighter and closer to Earth than normal. The event was initially visible from North and South America, as well as areas of western Europe. In parts of the UK some clouds obscured the view. The next total lunar eclipse is expected in ... Read More »

Francis Bacon: the 17th-century philosopher whose scientific ideas could tackle climate change today

If we don’t make a fundamental change to the way we are living, the world faces the destruction of entire eco-systems, flooding of coastal areas, and ever more extreme weather. Michael Wilby The Conversation Such was the stark warning in a recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. The task is enormous. One way to approach it is to look back to a time when scientific thinking did manage to initiate revolutionary changes in our outlook. In the 17th ... Read More »

To Save the Sound of a Stradivarius, a Whole City Must Keep Quiet

CREMONA, Italy — Florencia Rastelli was mortified. As an expert barista, she had never spilled a single cup of coffee, she said. But last Monday, as she wiped the counter at Chiave di Bacco, the cafe where she works, she knocked over a glass and it shattered loudly on the floor. Max Paradiso The New York Times The customers all stood still, petrified, Ms. Rastelli recalled. “I was like: Of all days, this one,” she said. “Even a police officer ... Read More »

A performer’s life: ‘It’s like starting over and over and over on a zero-hour contract’

Ireland sends out its impoverished artists with a fanfare of glitter and we return home to poverty Deirdre Falvey The Irish Times Artists’ lives offer a glimpse of the reality behind Theatre Forum’s review of performers’ payscales. Liv O’Donoghue, a choreographer and dancer, has toured her own acclaimed work, and performed across Europe, Australia and the US. “I’ve been lucky to be in relatively regular employment and some would say that I’ve been at the top of my game. But ... Read More »

Between the Millet System and EU Values: The Sunni Muslim Turkish State and Non-Muslim Minorities

The relationship between the state and non-Muslim communities[1] has been a sensitive issue since the founding of the Turkish Republic in 1923. Dr. Özgür Kaymak MDC Although the principle of secularism has been stated in the constitution, wherein the state was ostensibly required to distance itself from all religious beliefs equally,  Islam had always played an important role in the formation of Turkish identity. The debates with regard to freedom of religion and conscience as well as the rights of ... Read More »

The Damage of Demographic Misinterpretations

The way demographers treat Hispanics is both out of date and incorrect. Amitai Etzioni The National Interest The New York Times recently repeated an often cited misleading figure on demographics, that by 2044 “white Americans [are] projected to fall below half the population and lose their majority status.” This claim has unusually wide-reaching implications for America’s polarized politics. It is leading many whites, especially among those who have not been to college and who live in rural areas, to fear that they will be ... Read More »

The art of distraction: Sebastian Smee’s Quarterly Essay

Guilty as charged. Yes, I spend too much time on social media. Yes, I have become more easily distracted. Yes, I have given up too much personal information to various apps and websites over the years. And yes, I have read a number of articles that articulate precisely how foolish, or at least, misguided this… Stephanie Trigg The Conversation And so when I opened up Sebastian Smee’s Quarterly Essay, Net Loss: The Inner Life in the Digital Age, I was ... Read More »

Picturing Baghdad

Despite their traumatic history, Iraqis are finding individual and civic solutions to their country’s political failures. Julie David de Lossy ICG Crisis Group photographer Julie David de Lossy visited Baghdad in October-November 2018 and returned with portraits of its people’s search for normalcy. Iraq has endured decades of sanctions, war, invasion, regime change and dysfunctional government. These span Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship, a devastating eight-year war with Iran in the 1980s and crippling UN sanctions throughout the 1990s. Those difficult years ... Read More »

Hidden women of history: Caterina Cornaro, the last queen of Cyprus

The life of Caterina Cornaro could easily be the plot of a novel or TV drama. One of the most significant woman of Venice’s golden age, Cornaro (1454-1510) was an important figure in Renaissance politics, diplomacy and arts. Craig Barker The Conversation She reigned as the queen of Cyprus for 16 years under immense pressure. As a patron of the arts, she was painted by greats such as Dürer, Titian, Bellini and Giorgione. Yet today she is relatively little known ... Read More »

How A Facebook Page Helped Two Women Enter The Sabrimala Shrine

As a conservative backlash sought to silence women who wanted to visit Sabrimala, they turned online to find each other. K.A. Shaji HuffPost THIRUVANANTHAPURAM, Kerala —Forty two-year-old law professor Bindu Ammini, a law professor, and 44-year-old Kanakadurga, assistant manager of a state-run grocery store, first met online in… In the early hours of January 2 this year, the two women entered the shrine under heavy police protection, prompting a violent backlash from those opposed to allowing women “of… The two ... Read More »