Educational

Ancient crayfish and worms may die out together

Research suggests that bizarre, tentacled worms which live attached to crayfish in the rivers of Australia are at risk of extinction – because the crayfish themselves are endangered. It would be an example of coextinction, where one organism dies out because it depends on another doomed species. Just a few millimetres long, the worms eat even tinier animals in the water or inside the crayfish gill chamber… Source: Ancient crayfish and worms may die out together – BBC News Read More »

One day at Agkalia (Embrace)

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One day at Agkalia *(Embrace) we encountered group of seemingly tough young men. By Giorgos Tyrikos-Ergas * Μια μέρα στην Αγκαλιά… They set themselves apart from the other groups with the families and were just sitting around and loitering making comments about the volunteers, all kinds of insinuations about the women volunteers, and in general: they looked like trouble. When we started giving away food they did not wait in line. They cut in and grabbed it. To my request ... Read More »

Mongolia: Archaeologists Unearth Tomb of Genghis Khan

Öndörkhaan| Construction workers employed in road building near the Onon River in the Khentii province of Mongolia, have discovered a mass grave containing the remains of many dozens of human corpses lying upon a large rudimentary stone structure. Forensic experts and archaeologists were called on… Source: Mongolia: Archaeologists Unearth Tomb of Genghis Khan – World News Daily Report Read More »

America Has Never Been So Ripe for Tyranny

As this dystopian election campaign has unfolded, my mind keeps being tugged by a passage in Plato’s Republic. It has unsettled — even surprised — me from the moment I first read it in graduate school. The passage is from the part of the dialogue where Socrates and his friends are talking about the nature of different political systems, how they change over time, and how one can slowly evolve into another. And Socrates seemed pretty… Source: America Has Never Been ... Read More »

‘The Lost Book of Moses’ is a mystery of biblical proportions

Decades before the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, did a Jerusalem antiquities dealer really find a first draft of the Bible? The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947 by Bedouin shepherds catalyzed a… Source: ‘The Lost Book of Moses’ is a mystery of biblical proportions – CSMonitor.com Read More »

Beautiful 2,200-year-old mosaics discovered in ancient Greek city

In the ancient Greek City, Zeugma, which is located in today’s Turkey, unbelievable mosaics were uncovered,  dating back to the 2nd century BC, but incredibly… Source: Beautiful 2,200-year-old mosaics discovered in ancient Greek city Read More »

10-Year-Old Boy’s Moving Poem Gives A Glimpse At Life With Autism

“I am odd, I am new.” A class assignment turned into something more for one family after their son wrote a touching poem and gave a peek into life with autism. Benjamin Giroux, a 10-year-old boy who is on the spectrum, wrote a poem titled “I… Source: 10-Year-Old Boy’s Moving Poem Gives A Glimpse At Life With Autism Read More »

I don’t believe Captain Cook discovered Australia either, but unis can’t tell students what to think

A battle of ideas about Indigenous Australia in an open democracy founded on free speech isn’t helped by forced orthodoxy or group think.. I don’t believe Captain Cook discovered Australia. How can I? People were standing on the shore as he weighed… Source: I don’t believe Captain Cook discovered Australia either, but unis can’t tell students what to think | Stan Grant | Opinion | The Guardian Read More »

Turkish Gov’t Children’s Magazine Promotes Martyrdom

A cartoon published by the Turkish Ministry of Religious Affairs shows a father extolling the virtues of Islamic martyrdom to his son. A cartoon published by the Turkish Ministry of Religious Affairs shows a father extolling the virtues of Islamic martyrdom to his son… Source: Turkish Gov’t Children’s Magazine Promotes Martyrdom Read More »

Reviving the Mediterranean’s Lost Cosmopolitanism

Eastern Mediterranean cities that view migration as a threat today thrived on the ubiquitous presence of multicultural societies a century ago. Iason Athanasiadis opens our Reviving Cities series by explaining that the roots of today’s slow-motion refugee ‘disaster’ can be found in the region’s trend towards introversion… Source: Reviving the Mediterranean’s Lost Cosmopolitanism | Refugees Deeply Read More »

Fiona Richardson tells Australian Story of violent alcoholic father

Victoria’s first Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence Fiona Richardson has revealed that her father was a violent alcoholic, who beat her mother and siblings. Ms Richardson, who is also the state’s Minister for Women, returned to her birth country of Tanzania with her family for an ABC TV Australian Story program about her violent family history. The program was aired just a day before the… Source: Fiona Richardson tells Australian Story of violent alcoholic father Read More »

This is why Finland has the best schools

The Harvard education professor Howard Gardner once advised Americans, “Learn from Finland, which has the most effective schools and which does just about the opposite of what we are doing in the United States.”. Following his recommendation, I enrolled my seven-year-old son in a primary school in Joensuu. Finland, which is about as far east as you can go in the European Union before you… Source: This is why Finland has the best schools Read More »

‘You play football with your head, and your legs are there to help you’: Johan Cruyff in quotes

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The Dutch legend, who has died at the age of 68, came up with – and inspired – some of football’s most famous quotes. Cruyff on football “If I wanted you to understand it, I would have explained it better.” “Jack [Charlton] makes out he is not really interested in football, and tells the world he’s going… Source: ‘You play football with your head, and your legs are there to help you’: Johan Cruyff in quotes | Football | The ... Read More »

A world with less water

Water scarcity has long been a problem. But climate change, a growing global population and economic growth are putting the natural resource under even more stress. Brown with rust, two ships stand like stone upright in the yellow sand. The wind swirls salty air around the trawlers, silence echoing across the desert-like scenery. Now part of a graveyard of… Source: A world with less water | World | DW.COM | 22.03.2016 Read More »

Sweden: A football family for child refugees

Unaccompanied refugee minors in Gothenburg learn anything is possible through their football team and hard work. Gothenburg, Sweden  – Under floodlights on a synthetic grass pitch, teenage boys brave biting cold winds to hone their football skills – dribbling, passing, showing off fancy footwork and lining up to have a shot at goal… Source: Sweden: A football family for child refugees – Al Jazeera English Read More »

Did Charles Darwin use his children for science?

Newly discovered letters once again show that Darwin was a passionate and loving family man. Even so, his personal life was devoted to his understanding of the natural world. By Melissa Hogenboom When William Erasmus Darwin was born in December 1839, his father Charles began to meticulously record observations of his firstborn in a notebook… Source: BBC – Earth – Did Charles Darwin use his children for science? Read More »