Culture

Donald Trump makes Time cover again, this time over US-Mexico border immigration crisis

Donald Trump has got himself another Time magazine cover, but it’s probably not one he’ll be rushing to get his hands on. ABC The iconic American weekly news magazine published its latest front page and it was quickly being shared across the internet. It draws on the immigration crisis on the US-Mexico border and features the President looking down over a crying toddler. That crying toddler is a two-year-old Honduran, who was captured in a photo with her mother that ... Read More »

How refugee children make American education stronger

In recent years, there has been a great deal of public angst about refugee resettlement in the U.S. and Europe. Shawna Shapiro The Conversation Americans are deeply divided on the issue. For instance, a Pew Research Center study published in May of this year found that only a quarter of Republicans and right-leaning independents say the U.S. “has a responsibility to accept more refugees,” compared with almost three-quarters of Democrats and… Policies under the Trump administration reflect this division: The ... Read More »

How to heal African-Americans’ traumatic history

Do you smell it? That foul odor that floats in the air, when something you thought was dead is unearthed. Authors: The Conversation That’s the smell of ole man Jim Crow crawling back into our daily lives. One of the most horrendous and abhorrent forms of Jim Crow violence – the racial caste system that operated between 1877 and the mid-1960s, primarily in Southern states – was the publicly sanctioned use of… These killings were perpetrated by those who enjoyed ... Read More »

Why victims aren’t coming forward about forced marriages

Since forced marriage was criminalised in March 2013, over 230 cases have been referred to the AFP, but advocates say this number does not reflect the real number at risk. Sandra Siagian ABC They are calling for more measures to be introduced to protect victims and provide a safe space for them to come forward. No prosecutions here — why? Since the criminalisation of forced marriage in Australia, there have been no successful prosecutions. Commander Lesa Gale, who heads the ... Read More »

Is Our Wealth and Privilege Making Us Miserable?

Psychologist Adam Blanch considers why so many Australians are anxious despite being safer, wealthier, more privileged and more educated than ever before. Adam Blanch ProBono “Dear Adam, I am interested in your perspective. I look around and think as a society that we have more than we have ever had, but everyone seems more anxious and more depressed than ever before. What do you think is going on?” – Anon Dear Anon, I have had the privilege of living in ... Read More »

How Native American food is tied to important sacred stories

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld a lower court ruling, on June 11, that asked Washington state to remove culverts that block the migration of salmon. Rosalyn R. LaPier The Conversation The ruling has significant implications for Northwest Coast tribes, whose main source of food and livelihood is salmon. The legal decision stems from the 1855 Stevens treaties when Northwest Coast tribes retained the “right to take fish” from their traditional homelands. Fighting to protect salmon habitat, however, is more than ... Read More »

Forced marriage convictions are welcome but for many victims stigma is still judge and jury

In the four years since a change in the law regarding forced marriages in England and Wales, there have been two cases where parents have been convicted of forcing their daughters to marry by taking them out of the… Geetanjali Gangoli The Conversation One case, in Birmingham in May 2018, involved taking a daughter to Pakistan, the other – in Leeds, also in May 2018 – involved a couple luring their daughter to Bangladesh for a… These were the first ... Read More »

Europe’s youth wave

The average EU leader is now under 50, with populists leading a generational shift. We map the new crop and the crumbling center. Ryan Heath Politico In 2018 European politics it’s hip to be young, male and railing against the establishment. While many expected the Continent’s economic crisis to upend the political order, the backlash took longer to build, and unfurled itself at the ballot box rather than the street, starting with the election of then 40-year-old Alexis Tsipras in… ... Read More »

The art of healing: five medicinal plants used by Aboriginal Australians

People have lived in Australia for at least 65,000 years. In all those generations the land provided original Australians with everything they needed for a healthy life. Beth Gott The Conversation At least half the food eaten by the first Australians came from plants, and it was the task of women to collect them. Fruits, seeds and greens were seasonal, but roots could usually be dug up all year round, because the earth acted as a natural storage cupboard. The ... Read More »

NSW chooses timber over koalas, critics of habitat plan claim

The great bulk of new reserves set aside by the Berejiklian government for koala habitat offer no new protection for an animal whose numbers are plummeting in some regions of the state, new mapping analysis shows. Peter Hannam Brisbane Times The government last month hailed the release of its $45 million koala strategy as “the biggest commitment by any state” to protect the “national treasure”. But mapping details obtained by environmental groups show 82 per cent of the reserves being set aside ... Read More »

Catholics offer burial spaces to Muslims as Sydney cemeteries fill up

Muslim community leader Kazi Ali was distressed to see the nearly full Muslim section at Rookwood Cemetery that he helped transform 40 years ago from paddock to an oasis of palms. Julie Power The Sydney Morning Herald Many who helped Mr Ali build the cemetery in the 1980s are among the 6000 Muslims buried there now. A friend’s daughter was buried behind a white picket-style fence. Mr Ali pointed to a grave of his former teacher. “Our tradition is to ... Read More »

The Desperation to Keep Turkey Different

With an election looming, secularists are on the defensive to protect their way of life. Donna Abu-Nasr and Cagan Koc Bloomberg It’s the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, but in Istanbul smokers huddle outside offices, couples sip beer and sex workers call out to young men from balconies. The contrast with some Arab countries that penalize people for publicly breaking the dawn-to-dusk abstention from food and drink couldn’t be more striking in and around the city’s central Taksim Square. And supporters of that Turkish way ... Read More »

In Praise of Extreme Moderation

Why does it seem like you can’t throw a paper airplane in some offices without hitting a person who is training for a marathon, planning a 10-day silent meditation retreat, or intending on scaling Kilimanjaro? Avivah Wittenberg-Cox Harvard Business Review On top of working 24/7 for a company that doesn’t pay overtime? Extremism is becoming the norm not only in our professional lives but increasingly in our personal lives as well, from politics and parenting to food and fitness. Extreme ... Read More »

Aboriginal reconciliation and what we can learn from a French philosopher

What can a French historian and philosopher tell us about reconciliation between black and white in Australia? More than a century ago, when in Australia it was still widely presumed that Aboriginal people were a dying race, Ernest Renan was grappling with the question, what is a nation? By Matter of Fact host Stan Grant ABC It remains one of the most profound and powerful statements of identity, written in 1882 in the shadows of the French Revolution. Renan sought to ... Read More »

Largest swordfish ever caught in Australia may miss out on record due to fishing association requirements

The largest swordfish ever caught in Australia — and the second-largest in the world — may miss out on the official record because it did not meet strict rules in the way it was caught. ABC Illawarra Nick McLaren The monster fish was caught off Mallacoota near the NSW Victorian border on Sunday afternoon by a crew from the Ulladulla Game Fishing Club. It weighed in at 436.2 kilograms, well above what is thought to be the current Australian record ... Read More »

How your religion changes your views on the right to die

Rank-and-file Christians are at odds with religious leaders on euthanasia, with some denominations more supportive of voluntary assisted dying than others. Katie Burgess The Canberra Times As an ACT parliamentary inquiry into the end-of-life choices available to Canberrans continues, a survey of 1004 people has revealed how nearly half (48 per cent) of people with religious beliefs supported assisted dying laws. This is despite a hardline stance from some religious orders against legalising the practice. One of the report’s authors, Anthony ... Read More »