Arts & Culture

Is math discovered or invented? – Jeff Dekofsky

mat

Published on 27 Oct 2014 View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/is-math-dis… Would mathematics exist if people didn’t? Did we create mathematical concepts to help us understand the world around us, or is math the native language of the universe itself? Jeff Dekofsky traces some famous arguments in this ancient and hotly debated question. Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Tremendousness Collective. Read More »

A Child’s Drawings Preserved over the Centuries by “Magical Mud”

birchbark1

In one region of Russia, the consistency of the earth is just right that manuscripts dating back centuries emerge almost perfectly preserved. Over the past year, more than 1,000 of these birch bark artifacts from the 11th to 14th centuries have been exhumed from the soil of Novgorod, adding to a growing archive of written history. David M. Herszenhorn recently explained this phenomenon in the ... Read More »

Cultural Workers in Turkey Prepare for Hunger Strike over Underemployment

Yilmaz-2014-turkey-cultural-heritage-economics-politics-hunger-strike-141023-crop

Cultural workers in Turkey are set to go on hunger strike in protest of their unemployment and its endangerment of the country’s vulnerable cultural resources. In reaction to the government’s broken promise to hire 50 workers among the thousands of unemployed cultural heritage professionals, the Association of Culture and Art Workers (Kültür Sanat Emekçileri Derneği, or KSED) is taking desperate measures. If ... Read More »

9 Year-Old Spanish Boy Becomes Young Wildlife Photographer Of The Year

9-Years-Old-Spanish-Boy-Wins-Wildlife-Photographer-Of-The-Year-Contest8__700

Since 1964, the National History Museum in London has been organizing their annual Wildlife Photographer Of The Year contest. This year, the Grand title winner in Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year, which includes photographers up to 17 years of age, was Carlos Perez Naval – a 9-year-old boy from Spain. Carlos’ parents are tireless travelers, and they always take ... Read More »

Our Refugee Story unfolds in Bendigo

Julian in Bendigo 1a

HUNDREDS of people gathered to hear the stories of refugees on Saturday. Refugee activist Julian Burnside, author Najaf Mazari and local Karen refugees talked about their perspectives on asylum seekers. More than 250 people listened to a discussion by panel members Bendigo Bank’s National Community Strengthening manager Chris DeAraugo, Mt Alexander Shire mayor Michael Redden, Mr Burnside, Bendigo councillor Mark Weragoda and ... Read More »

On Aristotle, Friendship and bottom-dwellers…

Aristot 1a

In a particularly influential section of the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle reflects on the role of friendship {GR φιλία} and its effect on one’s life. In considering how humans should best live “a virtuous life” Aristotle considers friendship as a most vital element. He states that “without friends, no one would want to live, even if he had all other goods”. ... Read More »

Assange: Google Is Not What It Seems

1023wikileaks-02

In June 2011, Julian Assange received an unusual visitor: the chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt, arrived from America at Ellingham Hall, the country house in Norfolk, England where Assange was living under house arrest. For several hours the besieged leader of the world’s most famous insurgent publishing organization and the billionaire head of the world’s largest information empire locked horns. ... Read More »

Kerry James Marshall: Challenging racism in art history

p02975nr

For centuries black people appeared in art as slaves or exotic novelties – and the painter Kerry James Marshall wants to challenge these racist ideas. He talks to Alastair Sooke. “When I go to the movies, I’m expected to identify with all of the characters, and most of them are white,” says the African-American artist Kerry James Marshall, sitting on ... Read More »