Analysis

Progressives Should Read Progressive History—So They Don’t Blow It This Time

The original progressive reform movement was flexible and broad. That’s why it worked. Joshua Zeitz Politico “Medicare for All.” “The Green New Deal.” Calls to overhaul the Supreme Court and replace the Electoral College. Many activists today are heralding a new progressive movement—a successor to the vibrant reform coalition that swept both major political parties in the early years of the 20th century. There’s more than a little truth to this comparison. America’s current reality—marked by rising income inequality, the ... Read More »

Why we should care about Julian Assange? Because next time they come for us…

Wikileaks co-founder, Julian Assange, in 2010 published information provided to him by then-US Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning that comprised nearly 750,000 classified, or unclassified but sensitive, military and… Murray Hunter OnLineOpinion Among those documents was a collateral murder film clip that showed US Apache helicopters killing people in Iraq including two local Reuters news agency employees, exposing a US military cover-up. The military had claimed that the helicopters were responding to an active firefight and that all killed were ... Read More »

British Neocolonialism across Oceans: Chagos & Cyprus

Since the middle of last week many mass media outlets around the globe discuss the resolution of UN General Assembly (UNGA) about the Mauritius. ISF The relevant resolution calls Great Britain to give up control over the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean. London has been occupying the Chagos Archipelago Islands unlawfully (against the will of the indigenous people) since 1965. Ironically, it was the Harold Wilson headed Labour Government which on the 8th of November 1965 formally declared the ... Read More »

To tackle climate change, immigration and threats to democracy, Europe’s fractious new Parliament will have to work together

The European Union has survived its latest contest between pro-EU and anti-EU forces. Garret Martin The Conversation Helped by high turnout, pro-EU centrist and leftist parties together won more than two-thirds of seats in the European Parliament elections held in 28 countries from May 23 to 26. Populist parties intent on destroying the EU from within made only modest gains, increasing their share from 20% to 25% of the 751 seats. The European Parliament – one of the three institutions ... Read More »

What to Make of the European Elections

Right-wing populism is still growing—and has already established itself as a fixture on the political stage. Yascha Mounk The Atlantic The sheer scale of the European elections, coupled with the huge differences among the parties that were on the ballot from Sweden to Greece, makes it possible to find evidence for just about any story about the results. Perhaps because the rise of far-right populism has, three years after the surprise victory of Brexit and the shock election of Donald ... Read More »

Homelessness soars in our biggest cities, driven by rising inequality since 2001

Homelessness has increased greatly in Australian capital cities since 2001. Almost two-thirds of people experiencing homelessness are in these cities, with much of the growth associated with severely crowded dwellings and rough sleeping. Authors: The Conversation Homelessness in major cities, especially severe crowding, has risen disproportionately in areas with a shortage of affordable private rental housing and higher median rents. Severe crowding is also strongly associated with weak labour markets and poorer areas with a… These are some of the ... Read More »

Carelessly linking crime to being homeless adds to the harmful stigma

The news of Courtney Herron’s death has shocked Melburnians. While full details are yet to emerge, both she and the man charged with murdering her have been widely reported as being homeless. Authors: The Conversation It’s revealing how news media use this information in framing their coverage of what happened. Media use of the term “homeless” is rarely neutral. This is not to say someone’s housing status should never be included in reporting such events. However, we should be wary ... Read More »

Speaking with the “Bad Guys”: Toward Dialogue with Central Mali’s Jihadists

War between the state and jihadists in central Mali has led to growing intercommunal violence. ICG To spare civilians additional harm, the government should explore the possibility of talks with the insurgents about local ceasefires and humanitarian aid – while remaining open to broader discussions. What’s new? The war in central Mali has reached an impasse, with the state unable to defeat jihadist insurgents by force. The insurgency and military operations against it have exacerbated intercommunal violence. As a result, ... Read More »

Why an Indigenous Voice would not be ‘third chamber’ of Parliament

At Uluru in 2017, Indigenous Australians made clear that the kind of constitutional recognition they wanted was a living and continuing recognition, rather than mere words on a page of a… Anne Twomey The Sydney Morning Herald They called for recognition through an ongoing voice to Parliament about the laws and policies that affect them. In rejecting this proposal, one claim by the government was that this would be discriminatory and contrary to principles of equality because it would give ... Read More »

In graphics: How Europe voted

Explore the EU election through 5 graphs and charts. The European election resulted in a fragmented European Parliament where the traditional big two groups, the center-right European People’s Party (EPP) and the center-left Socialists & Democrats (S&D), lost ground and Euroskeptics made gains. By HANNA PAWELEC AND FRANCESCO PICCINELLI Politico Here are the latest results and estimates. Click on the graphic to explore more. Results The European Parliament election is also 28 national elections. Drill down into each national vote with the ... Read More »

A night at the opera: art comes alive in a modern twist on Rossini’s Il Viaggio a Reims

In 1864, four years before his death, Italian composer Gioachino Rossini recalled to his biographer Alexis Azevedo that he would probably have ended up a “chemist or an olive oil salesman” had it not been for the French invasion of Italy. Peter Tregear The Conversation That invasion had begun in 1792, the year of Rossini’s birth. By 1797, Napoleon Bonaparte had established the short-lived Cisalpine Republic in Northern Italy, in turn raising hopes a unified Italian state might soon emerge. ... Read More »

The United States is forcing Turkey to decide its loyalties – analysis

The United States would no longer tolerate Turkey playing a double game between Moscow and Washington and force the latter to decide its loyalties, writer James Gorrie said in the Epoch Times. Tiny Url Ahval “Turkey engages in a delicate and dangerous ballet on the fence which divides its allegiances to NATO and the West on one side, and Russia and militant Islamism on the other. Turkey wants it both ways, but their dance is fooling no one. Trump won’t ... Read More »

Assange’s new indictment: Espionage and the First Amendment

Julian Assange, the co-founder of WikiLeaks, has been charged by the U.S. Department of Justice with a slew of Espionage Act violations that could keep him in prison for… Ofer Raban The Conversation The new indictment expands an earlier one charging Assange with conspiring with Chelsea Manning, the former soldier convicted of leaking classified documents to… Assange is responsible for the dissemination of troves of classified American documents, including hundreds of thousands of military reports, hundreds of thousands of diplomatic ... Read More »

Climate change: ‘We’ve created a civilisation hell bent on destroying itself – I’m terrified’, writes Earth scientist

The coffee tasted bad. Acrid and with a sweet, sickly smell. The sort of coffee that results from overfilling the filter machine and then leaving the brew to stew on the hot plate for several hours. James Dyke The Conversation The sort of coffee I would drink continually during the day to keep whatever gears left in my head turning. Odours are powerfully connected to memories. And so it’s the smell of that bad coffee which has become entwined with ... Read More »

Child migrants around the world are being denied their human rights

At 3am we were forced to leave the bus station. We were caught by the police. They asked if we had passports. We said no, we are from Afghanistan, please help us – the police drove away. Afghani refugee, 15, on meeting police in Paris Authors: The Conversation Abed – not his real name – had been in Paris after a treacherous overland journey from Afghanistan. He is one of many youngsters whose families fear the situation in their own ... Read More »

Boris Johnson Is the EU’s Worst Nightmare

Europe’s top civil servant once described his potential leadership as a ‘horror scenario.’ Ian Wishart Bloomberg For European leaders watching Theresa May’s political death throes, a sense of inevitability has been replaced by one of fear. Rather than break the deadlock over Brexit, the departure of the British prime minister raises the prospect of what they’ve long considered their worst nightmare: a U.K. run by Boris Johnson, the… If May was predictable and her strategy clear, albeit flawed, many EU ... Read More »