Tougher German Rules Leave Refugee Families in the Lurch

Link

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel allowed hundreds of thousands of men into the country, many of the refugees believed they would be able to bring their families later.

Now the rules have changed, and countless women and children are trapped in perilous situations.

She stands at the window in a floor-length dress, with a blue headscarf, and looks out at the Mediterranean.

A fan hums in the next room.

Portrait of Tabarak Karakouz, a 21 years old Syrian refugee, inside her home outskirts Tripoli. Lebanon. She got married 3 years ago. Her husband is in Germany. Her daughter died. She spends all the day watching old pictures and dreaming with a better life with her husband in Europe. July 2017. Diego Ibarra Sánchez / MeMo for DER SPIEGEL

Portrait of Tabarak Karakouz, a 21 years old Syrian refugee, inside her home outskirts Tripoli. Lebanon. She got married 3 years ago. Her husband is in Germany. Her daughter died. She spends all the day watching old pictures and dreaming with a better life with her husband in Europe. July 2017. Diego Ibarra Sánchez / MeMo for DER SPIEGEL

Children play soccer in the dusty street outside the house.

An acacia tree grows crookedly on the hillside.

Tabarak Karakouz hates this place.

It’s been three years and two months since her husband Ammar left her behind in this hut on a hill in northern Lebanon.

In the interim, Tabarak has lost almost everything of importance to…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*